Portland-to-Coast walking team participation by off-duty Corps employees, Aug. 25, 2011

Portland-to-Coast walking team participation by off-duty Corps employees, Aug. 25, 2011
Occupational Health And Safety
Image by PortlandCorps
One of two teams of off-duty Corps employees participating in Portland-to-Coast today (Aug. 25, 2011). Go team!
Front row (left to right): Robin Norris, Bonneville Lock and Dam; Erica Jensen, Public Affairs; Melissa Rinehart, Natural Resource Management; Dave Stanton, Safety and Occupational Health; Leslie Nyquist, Budget, Manpower and Management.
Back: Jim Runkles, Bonneville Lock and Dam

Portland-to-Coast walking team participation by off-duty Corps employees, Aug. 25, 2011

Portland-to-Coast walking team participation by off-duty Corps employees, Aug. 25, 2011
Occupational Health And Safety
Image by PortlandCorps
One of two teams of off-duty Corps employees participating in Portland-to-Coast today (Aug. 25, 2011). Go team!
Front row (left to right): Robin Norris, Bonneville Lock and Dam; Erica Jensen, Public Affairs; Melissa Rinehart, Natural Resource Management; Dave Stanton, Safety and Occupational Health; Leslie Nyquist, Budget, Manpower and Management.
Back: Jim Runkles, Bonneville Lock and Dam

Swix Nordic Walking Rubber Tip/asphalt Paws – Boot Shaped Nordic Walking Rubber Tips/paws for Pavement, Indoor/outdoor Tracks, the Mall and Other Hard Surfaces

Swix Nordic Walking Rubber Tip/asphalt Paws – Boot Shaped Nordic Walking Rubber Tips/paws for Pavement, Indoor/outdoor Tracks, the Mall and Other Hard Surfaces

  • Real SWIX Nordic Walking Tips/Asphalt Paws from SWIX of Lillehammer, Norway
  • Rubber Nordic Walking Tips/Asphalt Paws For Indoor Use & Outside On Hard Surfaces (Pavement)
  • Quality Rubber Nordic Walking Tips/Asphalt Paws That Act As A Shock Absorber
  • Designed To Fit REAL Nordic Walking Poles From SWIX, Leki And EXEL
  • Natural Rubber Nordic Walking Tips/Asphalt Paws

Boot-Shaped Natural Rubber Nordic Walking Tips from SWIX of Lillehammer, Norway. These quality tips fit Nordic Walking Poles from SWIX, EXEL and LEKI. These are NOT cheap rubber tips from China! Always keep the toe of each boot shaped tip angled back behind you when Nordic Walking. For use on pavement, indoor/outdoor tracks, the mall and other hard surfaces. These Nordic Walking tips fit most SWIX, Leki and EXEL Nordic Walking Poles.

List Price: $ 8.95

Price: $ 8.95

Jogging: Jogging Music Lounge and Ultimate Workout Songs for Fitness Training, Aerobic Exercises, Workout Plans, Walking, Running, Footing and Jogging

Jogging: Jogging Music Lounge and Ultimate Workout Songs for Fitness Training, Aerobic Exercises, Workout Plans, Walking, Running, Footing and Jogging

List Price: $ 7.99

Price: $ 7.99

Exel Rubber Noridic Walking Tips/asphalt Paws Fit Exel, Swix and Leki Walking and Trekking Poles. These Are NOT Cheap Rubber Tips From China!

  • REAL EXEL Nordic Walking Tips/Asphalt Paws. Fit EXEL, LEKI and SWIX Nordic Walking and Trekking Poles
  • Original EXEL Nordic Walking Rubber Tips/Asphalt Paws. NOT Cheap rubber tips from China!
  • Ideal for use on hard surfaces – pavement, sidewalks, indoor/outdoor tracks, carpet, tile and even in the mall
  • The American Nordic Walking System and SKIWALKING.COM are the only source in North America for EXEL Poles and EXEL Nordic Walking Tips/Asphalt Paws.
  • Ideal for Nordic Walking on pavement and other hard surfaces – including leave no trace hiking on rocks.

The original EXEL Nordic Walking Tips/Asphalt Paws! Ideal for Nordic Walking on pavement and other hard surfaces – including leave no trace hiking on rocks. Longer lasting than the cheap rubber tips coming in from China. The American Nordic Walking System and SKIWALKING.COM are the only source in North America for EXEL Poles and EXEL Nordic Walking Tips/Asphalt Paws. .95 per pair. Fit most EXEL, LEKI and SWIX Nordic Walking and trekking poles.

List Price: $ 12.95

Price: $ 12.95

MBT Women’s Sport 2 Walking Shoe,Black,39 2/3 EU (US Women’s 9 M)

MBT Women’s Sport 2 Walking Shoe,Black,39 2/3 EU (US Women’s 9 M)

  • MBT SPORT2 BLACK SIZE 39 2/3(US 9)

MBT’s are not just a shoe in the ordinary sense. This product will not only change the way you use your muscles, but will improve the use of your joints and spine. MBT shoes are physiological footwear – the first footwear that has a positive effect on the entire body. MBT stands for “Masai Barefoot Technology.” MBT sneakers and casual shoes are designed using a multi-layered, curved sole which makes for a unique and rewarding walking experience.

List Price: $ 245.00

Price: $ 82.00

Walking for Fitness and Health Tips

www.santastory.org Walking for fitness, good health and longevity is one of the best, simples and cheapest exercise practices. Regular walking has been proven to increase life span through reducing vulnerability to heart disease, cancer, diabetes and other common illnesses. Walking can also be enjoyable, making it the preferred exercise for fitness form for millions of people.

MBT Women’s Sport 2 Walking Shoe,Black,36 1/3 EU (US Women’s 6.5 M)

MBT Women’s Sport 2 Walking Shoe,Black,36 1/3 EU (US Women’s 6.5 M)

  • MBT is the first physiological footwear that has a positive effect on the whole body
  • Padded tongue and collar provides added comfort
  • TPU and glass fiber shank adds firmness to sole construction and also ensures a natural rolling movement of the foot with every step which optimizes the pressure distribution over the whole sole
  • PU midsole with pivot is the balancing section underneath the metatarsus which requires an active rolling movement with every step. Thus, activating a large number of stabilizing muscles throughout the whole body when walking or standing
  • Rubber outsole
  • MBT® is the first physiological footwear that has a positive effect on the whole body.
  • The ‘Sport 2’ sneaker features a new, updated look and PU-coated material, single-layer mesh uppers for style and breathability.
  • Ghillie lacing allows for quick and easy adjustability and a customized fit.
  • Padded tongue and collar offers added comfort for immediate wear.
  • Mesh lining helps wick away moisture for a healthy foot environment.
  • Perforated, EVA insole provides added cushioning with antibacterial treatment to reduce odor.
  • TPU and glass fiber shank adds firmness to sole construction and also ensures a natural rolling movement of the foot for even weight distribution.
  • PU midsole with pivot is the balancing section underneath the metatarsus which requires an active rolling movement with every step.
  • This activates a large number of stabilizing muscles throughout the whole body when walking or standing.
  • Masai Sensor (Masai Barefoot Technology®) creates a pleasant feeling of walking on a sandy beach or soft moss.
  • Instantly offers a natural instability to which the body automatically reacts increasing muscle activity.
  • Durable rubber outsole offers lightweight support with good traction on a variety of surfaces.
  • Weight: 16 oz
  • Product measurements were taken using size 36 1/3 (US Women’s 6.5). Please note that measurements may vary by size.

List Price: $ 245.00

Price: $ 116.99

Walking in Central Park

Walking in Central Park
Healthy Diet Tips

Image by Ed Yourdon
Summer weekend in Central Park, 2005 – 16

These pictures were all taken on a Saturday afternoon stroll around Central Park — starting on the west side of the park at approx 86th street, heading south down past Tavern on the Green, and then up the East Side to the 104th cut, and back around…

The temperature was pleasant, but the sky turned from a hazy blue to a hazy gray during the walk, which washed out some of the pictures a bit…

Two young women, strolling along, chattering away about whatever it is that young women chatter about. Nothing particularly unusual about them — they were typical of dozens, if not hundreds, of other young, reasonably athletic young women out for some sunshine and exercise in the park.

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Note: this photo was published in an Oct 6, 2008 blog titled "Warm up to these 2 exercises." It was also published in a March 14, 2009 blog article entitled "Top 8 Exercise Myths." It was also published in a Nov 23, 2009 blog titled "Beauty 101: Get some PMS SOS." And it was published in a Nov 30, 2009 blog titled "Weight Loss Tips and Tricks."

Moving into 2010, the photo was published in a Mar 7, 2010 Slimsix-dot-net blog with the same title as the caption I used on this Flickr page. And it was published in a Jun 11, 2010 blog titled "My Weight Loss Tips" It was also published in an Oct 15, 2010 , with the same title as the caption on this Flickr page. And it was published in a Dec 7, 2010 blog titled "Cutting Darren down to size."

Moving into 2011, the photo was published in a Jan 3, 2011 blog titled "BMI, calorie intake and being big boned?someone explain!!?" It was also published in an undated (early Jan 2011) blog titled "." And it was published in a Jan 16, 2011 blog titled "How Can I Make Any Girl Fall in Love With Me Instantly? Here Are Three Unfailing Tips." It was also published in a Mar 12, 2011 blog titled "Walking in Central Park." And it was published in an undated (late May 2011) blog titled "Live Lean for Life Unveils Exciting Weight Loss Tips and Tricks." It was also published in a Jun 8, 2011 blog titled "I am 37 & want to start a quick weight loss diet & a exercise program to build mass. Any suggestions?" And it was published in a Jul 3, 2011 blog titled "Weight Loss Psychology: Why Your Brain Might be Holding You Back."

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Note: on Jan 20, 2010 I replaced the original version of this photo with a slightly edited version. The original, which I took in the summer of 2005, was edited with the Apple-Macintosh "iPhoto" program, and all I did was crop the photo to remove irrelevant scenic elements … and perhaps a little color-saturation to highlight the various colors involved.

I’m now using the Apple-Macintosh "Aperture" program, and I realized that I could edit the dark shadows and nearly-black color of the shorts worn by the two women. The current version has a little more "noise" (aka "graininess," in the pre-digital days) than I would have preferred, but you can see more details of their legs than was visible before…

With or without the detail, they are both still beautiful young women. I have no idea who they were, never spoke to them when I took this photo, and will probably never see them again for the rest of their lives or my life. C’est la vie…

Susan, how are we ever gonna lose any weight if we don’t *ride* our bicycles? Walking them doesn’t burn off any calories…

Susan, how are we ever gonna lose any weight if we don’t *ride* our bicycles? Walking them doesn’t burn off any calories…
Pet Health Tips
Image by Ed Yourdon
Note: this photo was published in a Sep 6, 2010 "Lose Weight Workout blog, with the same title as the caption that I used on this Flickr page. It was also published in an Oct 3, 2010 Out Of Shape-dot-net blog, with the same title as the caption that I used on this Flickr page. And it was published in an Oct 28, 2010 GettingWeightLoss-dot-com blog, with the same title and notes as what I had written on this Flickr page. It was also published in a Dec 25, 2010 blog titled "Weight loss tips counting calories to lose weight."

Moving into 2011, the photo was published in a Feb 15, 2011 blog titled "Are you a health food junkie? How a dangerously obsessive quest for the perfect body has become the new middle-class … " And it was published in an undated (late May 2011) Cool Weight Loss Tips Images blog, with the same caption and detailed notes that I had written on this Flickr page. It was also published in a Jun 6, 2011 blog titled Travel: three for the road , with the same caption and detailed notes that I had written on this Flickr page.

****************

Because Central Park occupies a massive 843 acres in the (duh!) center of Manhattan, it’s no surprise that there area numerous entrances and exits all around the perimeter of the park. Some of them are quite well known — such as the entrance on the southeast corner, at Fifth Avenue and 59th Street (across the street from the GM Building and the old Plaza Hotel), or the entrance at the western side of the 72nd Street "transverse" that cuts through the park and comes out on Fifth Avenue (well known because the statuesque Dakota apartment building, where John Lennon once lived, is located at Central Park West and 72nd Street).

Based on where they live, and based on their normal work and leisure routines, most New Yorkers tend to favor certain entrances and exits, and may never have used (or even seen) certain other ones. In my case, for example, I’ve always been aware that there’s an entrance at the southwestern corner of the park, right at Columbus Circle. It’s officially known as Merchant’s Gate — and it’s hard to miss, because there’s an enormous monument commemorating the explosion/sinking of the Maine in February 1898, which precipitated the Spanish-American War. But since I don’t live, work, or travel to that particular corner of Manhattan very often, I’ve almost never used that entrance to the park. By "almost never," I mean only once or twice in the 40+ years that I’ve lived in New York City.

I don’t think that this almost-perfect record of non-use of a park entrance has had any negative effect on my life … but it occurred to me, the other day, that I might have missed some interesting photographic opportunities. And since I was getting a little bored by returning to the same old places to photograph the same old scenes in other parts of the city, over and over again, I decided that the southwestern corner of Central Park was worth taking a look at.

As you might imagine, the massive Maine monument dominates the scene — and I felt obliged to photograph it once or twice, just to acknowledge its existence. But after that … well, it turns out that it’s not really all that photogenic, and nobody was paying much attention to it. Aside from the monument, there was an open mini-plaza where people could walk, chat, sit, and relax — presumably on the way into, or the way out of, the park itself. There were a couple of food stands, offering items that looked slightly more nourishing and tasty than the stuff available from the usual hot-dog stands that one finds throughout the park (and almost every street corner). I wasn’t hungry myself, but I noticed that several people bought a snack, or a sandwich, and then found a convenient spot to sit and relax while they munched and nibbled.

So, in the end, the photographic opportunities turned out to be pretty much the same as always: it was the people who were the most interesting — not the statues or the squirrels or the trees or the flowers. There were tourists, and New Yorkers on their lunch break, and students from a local parochial school, and office workers on their lunch break. There was a Statue of Liberty mime, a few retired people, some bicyclists, joggers, and athletes. There were nannies pushing babies in strollers, and mothers carrying babies in snugglies and backpacks, and dog-walkers with their pets. There were crazy-looking people, and beautiful people, and ugly people.

And there were lots, and lots, and lots of guys hustling unwary tourists, offering them rides and tours through the park in their brightly-colored pedicabs. Perhaps because I was wielding a camera, I was mistaken by several of these guys as a tourist; when I responded to their pitch about a park ride by saying, "I live here," they gave me a disgusted look and quickly moved away. Meanwhile, several other vendors had tables with photos and trinkets and bawdy signs that they did their best to sell to anyone who walked by. All of this, as best I could tell, was dutifully recorded by a NYC Police Dept. security camera, which sat high above it all … but nobody seemed to even notice it.

I took some 300+ photos to document all of this, and winnowed it down to 50 "keepers" that will hopefully give you a reasonably good impression of what the scene looked like. Having done so, I hopped in a taxi and headed back uptown. For all I know, it may be another 40 years before I enter this corner of the park again…