Easy, healthy meals for soldiers living in barracks?

Question by Mrs. Winfrey<3: Easy, healthy meals for soldiers living in barracks?
Healthier eating makes for better PT and fitter soldiers, but its hard when they don’t have the time to get to a dfac and they arn’t supplied kitchens. Can anyone suggest easy to make meals for soldiers with microwave access? :’D

Best answer:

Answer by onecookingfool
Here are two breakfast ideas:

Oatmeal with Dried Cranberries

Place about 1 cup of regular oatmeal in a Pyrex bowl or measuring cup. Add a pinch of salt and cinnamon if available. Cover with about 1-1/2 – 2 cups of water. Stir, and microwave on high for 1 minute. Stir again, and microwave in 30 second intervals until it bubbles and expands. (It should still be wet when done.) Cover with a plate and let set for a few minutes to absorb the rest of the water. Serve with butter (optional), sugar and milk.

Eggs, Poached or Scrambled

Crack eggs in a glass bowl and add a bit of water. Cover and microwave until the whites are just set. For scrambled eggs, whisk with a fork and cook, stirring every 15-20 seconds until they are the consistency you like.

What do you think? Answer below!

Army chef provides comfort to Soldiers and Families in central Alaska 110914

Army chef provides comfort to Soldiers and Families in central Alaska 110914
Dinner Recipes For Kids
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PHOTO CAPTION: View of the new Fort Greely Community Activity Center, Alaska. The menu will include regional favorites such as reindeer sausage and bison burgers, but will also include American favorites such as pizza and Philly Cheesesteak sandwiches. The new center will have food, bowling, arcade and game activities, meeting rooms and Wifi.

Photo by Daniel Cain, Fort Greeley

Army chef provides comfort to Soldiers and Families in central Alaska 110914

By Robert Dozier
IMCOM Public Affairs

Reindeer sausage and bison burgers have only one thing in common. These regional delicacies are featured on the menu for the new Fort Greeley Community Activity Center set to open soon.

“Our menu is extremely family friendly,” said Russell Littel, Chef/Food & Beverage Specialist, Business Operations Directorate. “We offer the ‘lighter fare’ that is in high demand today. There are a variety of healthy salads, and for central Alaska, the soup of the day is essential.”

Fort Greely sits about 320 miles northeast of Anchorage. In July, the average high temperature is 69 degrees. In January, however, the average low is – 11 degrees. At these extremes, comfort is measured in family, fun and good food.

“Healthier options for Soldiers and their Families are the key,” said Littel. “As a father, I can appreciate how important the kids’ menu is.”

There are 84 recipes that Business Operations is managing at the center, where normally a 30-to-40 item menu is common.

“These Soldiers haven’t been to the lower 48 in a while, and pizza, cheesesteak and a good hamburger are a must,” said Littel. “What is uncommon is our “broasted” chicken, which is fried in a pressure cooker.”

Broasted chicken is a method similar to that used by some of the most popular and successful fried chicken retail restaurants.

“This method is quicker to prepare and is a more juicy and crunchy product,” said Littel. “With this recipe and the others, we wanted broad menu choices so that our customers could eat here on a daily basis, maybe two weeks straight, and not have to choose the same menu item.”

The Greely facility has been on the radar for about a year at Business Operations, a department in the G9 Division of the Installation Management Command. They get involved once a need is defined at the Army garrison. In this case, a brand new multi-purpose facility was proposed, including dining, bowling, meetings, arcade and games, requiring the best food that the Army could provide. Business Operations assessed the existing facilities and employee skill sets, lunch and dinner programs, and determined what was best and realistic for the area.

“We don’t just plan the meals,” said Littel, “we design comfort for the men and women serving here.”

Chef Littel also serves as an infantryman and food operations sergeant for the Texas National Guard in the 36th Infantry Division. He will be deploying next year to Afghanistan.
“There are hundreds of Reservists and National Guardsmen who come to Greely to do their mission,” Littel said. “Many have families close by or in town who can really benefit from our planning.”

The Fort Greely Community Activity Center will feature an 8 lane bowling center, billiards, darts, shuffle board and air hockey.

“Think: rec center meets warrior club meets NCO club,” said Daniel Cain, Community Activity Center Manager. “It’ll have a sports bar feel, with a giant chalet-style fireplace at its focal point, but good food is the key.”

The center will have a reading area, an internet capable computer room, a 60-inch television room with theater seating and Wifi, as well.

“This will be the social hub for the Fort Greely Family – Soldiers, , Families, full time National Guard and civilians,” said Cain. “Quality of life-wise, this will be night and day.”

Fort Greely has grown by leaps and bounds in recent years. With growth comes the expectation from the community for facilities that improve the day-to-day experience.

“We are chomping at the bit for the opening,” said Tracy Miley, wife of Col. Joseph L. Miley, commander of the 49th Missile Defense Battalion, “and I love that the menu will have healthy choices for the adults and the children. The community center will become a huge mecca. How amazing is this to have everything right here?”

Army chef provides comfort to Soldiers and Families in central Alaska 110914

Army chef provides comfort to Soldiers and Families in central Alaska 110914
Dinner Recipes For Kids
Image by familymwr
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR

PHOTO CAPTION: Army Chef Russell Littel at home perfecting his technique for the menu preparation of the new Fort Greeley Community Activity Center, Alaska. The menu will include regional favorites such as reindeer sausage and bison burgers, but will also include American favorites such as pizza and Philly Cheesesteak sandwiches.

Photo by permission

Army chef provides comfort to Soldiers and Families in central Alaska 110914

By Robert Dozier
IMCOM Public Affairs

Reindeer sausage and bison burgers have only one thing in common. These regional delicacies are featured on the menu for the new Fort Greeley Community Activity Center set to open soon.

“Our menu is extremely family friendly,” said Russell Littel, Chef/Food & Beverage Specialist, Business Operations Directorate. “We offer the ‘lighter fare’ that is in high demand today. There are a variety of healthy salads, and for central Alaska, the soup of the day is essential.”

Fort Greely sits about 320 miles northeast of Anchorage. In July, the average high temperature is 69 degrees. In January, however, the average low is – 11 degrees. At these extremes, comfort is measured in family, fun and good food.

“Healthier options for Soldiers and their Families are the key,” said Littel. “As a father, I can appreciate how important the kids’ menu is.”

There are 84 recipes that Business Operations is managing at the center, where normally a 30-to-40 item menu is common.

“These Soldiers haven’t been to the lower 48 in a while, and pizza, cheesesteak and a good hamburger are a must,” said Littel. “What is uncommon is our “broasted” chicken, which is fried in a pressure cooker.”

Broasted chicken is a method similar to that used by some of the most popular and successful fried chicken retail restaurants.

“This method is quicker to prepare and is a more juicy and crunchy product,” said Littel. “With this recipe and the others, we wanted broad menu choices so that our customers could eat here on a daily basis, maybe two weeks straight, and not have to choose the same menu item.”

The Greely facility has been on the radar for about a year at Business Operations, a department in the G9 Division of the Installation Management Command. They get involved once a need is defined at the Army garrison. In this case, a brand new multi-purpose facility was proposed, including dining, bowling, meetings, arcade and games, requiring the best food that the Army could provide. Business Operations assessed the existing facilities and employee skill sets, lunch and dinner programs, and determined what was best and realistic for the area.

“We don’t just plan the meals,” said Littel, “we design comfort for the men and women serving here.”

Chef Littel also serves as an infantryman and food operations sergeant for the Texas National Guard in the 36th Infantry Division. He will be deploying next year to Afghanistan.
“There are hundreds of Reservists and National Guardsmen who come to Greely to do their mission,” Littel said. “Many have families close by or in town who can really benefit from our planning.”

The Fort Greely Community Activity Center will feature an 8 lane bowling center, billiards, darts, shuffle board and air hockey.

“Think: rec center meets warrior club meets NCO club,” said Daniel Cain, Community Activity Center Manager. “It’ll have a sports bar feel, with a giant chalet-style fireplace at its focal point, but good food is the key.”

The center will have a reading area, an internet capable computer room, a 60-inch television room with theater seating and Wifi, as well.

“This will be the social hub for the Fort Greely Family – Soldiers, , Families, full time National Guard and civilians,” said Cain. “Quality of life-wise, this will be night and day.”

Fort Greely has grown by leaps and bounds in recent years. With growth comes the expectation from the community for facilities that improve the day-to-day experience.

“We are chomping at the bit for the opening,” said Tracy Miley, wife of Col. Joseph L. Miley, commander of the 49th Missile Defense Battalion, “and I love that the menu will have healthy choices for the adults and the children. The community center will become a huge mecca. How amazing is this to have everything right here?”

Reunion briefings prepare Families for Soldiers’ return – FMWRC – US Army – 100819

Reunion briefings prepare Families for Soldiers’ return – FMWRC – US Army – 100819
pet health tips
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Reunion briefings prepare Families for Soldiers’ return

Aug 19, 2010

By Jennifer Hartwig (3rd Infantry Division Ft Stewart)

FORT STEWART, Ga. – Soldiers of the 3rd Infantry Division have begun to return to Fort Stewart, Hunter Army Airfield and Kelley Hill at Fort Benning, after a year-long deployment. The initial reunion is full of hugs and happiness, but learning to be a Family again takes a lot of work.

There are always questions – will my Soldier be different? Will my Soldier still love and need me? Will my Soldier want to spend more time with battle buddies than his Family? When will things feel like normal again?

Whether a Family is going through the redeployment process for the first time or the fourth time, these questions are normal and come up with each deployment, according to Linda Moseley, Stewart-Hunter Army Community Service Mobilization and Deployment Manager.

Even if you’ve been to a Family reunion briefing in the past, Moseley said it is important to attend before your Soldier returns home this time, as well.

"We’ve been through so many deployments as a division so these Families, a lot of them, have been here for quite a few deployments," Moseley said. "But I think our approach now is multi-faceted – we’re offering so many more services through the new resiliency training, the new programs that are available through ACS. We’re using other programs and services as well as re-created a series of additional programs. ‘I think before it was simply a briefing and that was it."

Moseley said that this time around, there are many topics discussed in the briefings, and programs offered by ACS, that weren’t available in previous years.

"We talk more about intimacy and the relationship; we talk more about connections and connectivity between you and your spouse; and we talk more openly and freely about household problems," she said. "In the past, we’ve addressed domestic abuse or perhaps traumatic brain injury or PTSD, but [this time] we’re making it so it’s simply understood by every Family – that if you notice a change in your Soldier or yourself, then it’s easily identifiable, and you can seek help early on."

Each unit that is deployed has or will offer 9 or10 Family reunion briefings once the unit is within the 90-day window of returning.

The briefing touches on many of the major questions people have, and gives those in attendance tips on how to make the reintegration process less problematic.

The briefing, given by Moseley or another ACS mobilization and deployment specialist, teaches Family Members to have realistic expectations about how life will be once their Soldier returns, and to talk about what your expectations are before the Soldier comes home.

"Families have to get used to each other again," Moseley said. "Expect that things will be different than they were prior to the deployment."

One spouse, who attended a Family reunion briefing, July 23, was anxious to learn what to expect when her spouse returns from their first deployment as a couple.

"We’re learning how to cope with our spouses once they get back; the dos and the don’ts," said Frankie Andrews, wife of Command Sgt. Maj. Jesse Andrews, 3rd ID command sergeant major. Though it is not Command Sgt. Maj. Andrew’s first deployment, it is the first he and Frankie have been through together. "We’re learning the different symptoms our spouse may have; how to deal with drinking, anger, dealing with their children. We (each) need to be a good, understanding spouse; we need to be patient."

The briefing deals with health issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse and depression, and how to recognize those symptoms in both your Soldier and yourself. Also discussed is how to deal with sharing of experiences – what do you do if your Soldier tells you too much? How do you deal with your Soldier if he or she won’t talk about their experiences at all? Moseley said that you need to work it out as a couple – discuss how much you want to know, and also realize that, though you don’t know their experiences for the past year, they don’t know yours, either. It will take time to adjust to being together day-to-day again, she said.

For those with children, ACS is offering – for the first time – child-specific programs during this time of readjustment leading up to the return of the 3rd ID Soldiers, including Sgt. Rocky’s Neighborhood, a puppet show that helps children deal with issues in an age-appropriate setting.

"We haven’t had many child-specific programs in the past, and this [redeployment] we have the Sgt. Rocky program, and for the first time we’re incorporating pets into the household," Moseley said. "A child receives and copes differently and so when we have these animated characters that come to life the parents enjoy how the material is presented and the children seem to absorb it better."

For one spouse, the topic of children was one that is especially important in her Family.

"(The topic) most important to me is I think the interaction with our Soldiers and children," said Cassandra Spaans, who has a five-year-old daughter with husband Sgt. Dean Spaans, Headquarters and Headquarters Services Company, Division Special Troops Battallion, 3rd ID. "I know how to deal with myself; sometimes you just don’t know how to deal with the emotions of the child and how they’re going to interact with the spouse and Daddy coming back."

Sergeant Spaans has been deployed for two-and-a-half of the past three years.

"This briefing isn’t just because that your spouse is coming back, it’s also giving information on how to deal with being separated for a year, and how to mold your lives back together," said Cassandra, who is the HHSC Family Readiness Group leader. "We’ve been living our separate lives, and we need to get back together, and this [briefing] is actually giving us ideas on how to do that."

Fort Stewart-Hunter Army Airfield ACS is offering workshops for the 90-, 60- and 30-day intervals before homecoming. The ACS mobilization and deployment specialists want to ensure that everyone realizes that reintegration is a process for the Family as a whole.

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Soldiers Conduct Night Time Planning Brief

Soldiers Conduct Night Time Planning Brief
exercise plan
Image by Defence Images
Soldiers conduct a night time planning brief during Exercise Grand Prix 5 in Africa.

Troops from the 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment Battle Group conduct Exercise Grand Prix 5 in Kenya.

The troops spent approximately five weeks in Kenya which culminated in a week-long Final Training Exercise (FTX) in an area north of Nanyuki from 18-23 February 2010.

The week began with troops conducting hearts and minds patrols through villages populated by local Kenyans and finished with a Battle Group size attack on another village.

The exercise is known as Hybrid Foundation Training, providing them with generic skills, however, the training will also help in their preparation for returning to Afghanistan in September 2010 on Op Herrick 13.
Photographer: Cpl Rupert Frere RLC
From: www.defenceimages.mod.uk