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Image by Wickerfurniture
via Tumblr blog.wickerparadise.com/post/40083037864/wicker-furniture…

How to shop on a budget?

Question by animefan749: How to shop on a budget?
I’m a bit of an impulse buyer and love to spend money that I have on cute clothes mostly, because wearing what I like makes me feel good. I saved over $ 3000 this past summer, but I am now reduced to the low amount of $ 80. WTF is wrong with me?! I need to learn how to shop on a budget. Any tips?

Best answer:

Answer by LemonZest
Shopping on a budget is tricky as I know myself, but planning is pretty helpful.
Next time you know you’re going shopping, write down the things that you NEED. Look on the internet at the shops you’re planning to go to and add up the prices of the things you’re going to get.
Once you know the total, only put that amount of money in your purse. (leeways are allowed, but only a little!)
If you keep practising this, you should be fine. 🙂

Give your answer to this question below!

Shop for a Day with Jaci Rae – How to Get Almost Anything for Free

Shop for a Day with Jaci Rae – How to Get Almost Anything for Free

The American dream of a steady job, a house of your own and extra money in the bank appears out of reach for many in today s economy. “Life is expensive, but living doesn’t have to be.” says Jaci Rae. Jaci Rae, who was raised in poverty and knows the value of a dollar, can show you that it doesn t have to be a struggle. The tips and advice that Jaci Rae will share with you in Shop for a Day with Jaci Rae – How to Get Almost Anything for Free or Next to It are not ‘get rich quick schemes’ and there are no hidden costs. There are only straightforward strategies that are easy to understand. While saving money and getting things free will require effort, the rewards are great. Do you want to travel the world but feel you don’t have the money? Now you can do all this and more for less money than you ever dreamed possible. Sound too good to be true? Jaci Rae has done it and she wants to show you how you can do it too!The American dream of a steady job, a house of your own and extra money in the bank appears out of reach for many in today s economy. “Life is expensive, but living doesn’t have to be.” says Jaci Rae. Jaci Rae, who was raised in poverty and knows the value of a dollar, can show you that it doesn t have to be a struggle. The tips and advice that Jaci Rae will share with you in Shop for a Day with Jaci Rae – How to Get Almost Anything for Free or Next to It are not ‘get rich quick schemes’ and there are no hidden costs. There are only straightforward strategies that are easy to understand. While saving money and getting things free will require effort, the rewards are great. Do you want to travel the world but feel you don’t have the money? Now you can do all this and more for less money than you ever dreamed possible. Sound too good to be true? Jaci Rae has done it and she wants to show you how you can do it too!

List Price: $ 35.95

Price: $ 35.95

Supershop like the Coupon Queen: How to Save 50% or More Every Time You Shop

Supershop like the Coupon Queen: How to Save 50% or More Every Time You Shop

The original “Coupon Queen” and New York Times bestselling author shares her unique Five-Step Supershopping System.

Regardless of age, locality, and lifestyle, saving money is high on everyone’s list today. In this long awaited follow-up to the bestselling Cashing In at the Checkout, Susan Samtur explains her Five-Step Supershopping System, a new technique that will show readers how they can save 50% or more every time they shop. Samtur’s is the first system that converges new supermarket savings technologies- rewards programs, store cards, websites-with traditional proven techniques, like couponing and refunding.

List Price: $ 15.00

Price: $ 3.29

How to Shop for Healthy Foods : Health & Digestion with Slow Eating

Eating slowly and chewing your food will promote better digestion.Learn how to shop for healthy foods to improve your diet and nutrition in this free video. Expert: Lisa La Barr Bio: Lisa La Barr is AFPA certified, a WAPF member, and a personal nutrition and wellness expert in Beverly Hills. Filmmaker: Nili Nathan

Cooking Mama 3: Shop & Chop

Cooking Mama 3: Shop & Chop

  • Earn bronze, silver, and gold medals from Mama based on the quality of your cooking.
  • Use the stylus as your ultimate cooking utensil to chop, grate, slice, stir, spread, sprinkle, roll, and much more in over 200 different mini-games.
  • Create 80 new recipes including: chili con carne, mushroom quiche, Eggs Benedict, tulip chicken, pumpkin gnocchi, and many more.
  • Six gameplay modes including old favorites and new additions to the series.
  • Recipes progress from simple to complex, from small to large dishes, so do your best to meet Mama’s expectations and impress your friends.

Fresh from the harvest in Gardening Mama, Mama’s heading back to her kitchen roots with all new recipes, ingredient shopping, dish combinations and multiplayer cooking challenges. Explore your inner creative chef with everyone’s favorite culinary cutie! Six gameplay modes including new additions to the series: -Let’s Cook: Even if you make mistakes Mama will help you complete the recipe so you can continue cooking. -Let’s Eat: You’re on your own without Mama’s help. Now it’s just you, the food and your hard-to-satisfy friends who will try out your creations and judge you based on how they taste. Mistakes made during preparation will affect the final taste so use caution in the kitchen! -Combine and Create: Mama’s been teaching you for some time now, and she’s decided it’s time for you to exercise your creative muscle. Take steps and ingredients from different recipes and create your very own concoctions. -Let’s Shop: Did you ever wonder where Mama gets all those fantastic ingredients? Head to the store to pick up the things you’ll need to prepare so many delicious dishes. -Time Challenge: Play against up to 3 friends using local wi-fi play. Faceoff in timed cooking challenges to determine who is the fastest chef! -Picture Diary: Keep a scrapbook of your favorite dishes in this digital picture diary.

Fresh from the harvest in Gardening Mama, Mama’s heading back to her culinary roots with Cooking Mama 3: Shop and Chop. Packed with six game modes–including two new to the game franchise–all new recipes, ingredient shopping, dish combinations and multiplayer cooking challenges, Cooking Mama 3: Shop and Chop lets players explore their inner creative chef with everyone’s favorite kitchen cutie at their side.

Cooking Mama 3: Shop & Chop game logo
Traditional stir fry Cooking Mama gameplay from Cooking Mama 3: Shop & Chop
Traditional Cooking Mama play.
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A Let's Shop Mode screen capture from Cooking Mama 3: Shop & Chop
New game modes like Let’s Shop.
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The mushroom quiche challenge entered into player's Picture Diary in Cooking Mama 3: Shop & Chop
More than 80 recipes.
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Gameplay
Like all Cooking Mama releases, Cooking Mama 3: Shop & Chop is a collection of frantic mini-games designed to test the players skill in the kitchen. Shop & Chop‘s tally of these mini-games weighs in at a whopping 200+, and cover every aspect of meal preparation, including mixing, frying, chopping, baking, slicing, grilling and more. Inputs during these are mostly registered by using the DS/DSi stylus, or the user’s finger on the touchscreen, with some dishes only requiring the completion of a single mini-game, while others consist of several. Along the way Mama will always be with players, offering guidance and support, and in the case of a particularly poorly prepared meal, even a little bit of disappointment meant to inspire the player to do better. Shop & Chop contains more than 80 recipes. in all, and includes multiplayer game support for up to four players in single-cart DS wireless download play.

Game Modes
Cooking Mama 3: Shop & Chop also contains gameplay variety through the several different game modes included. There are six of these in all, combining favorites from earlier game releases, and a few brand new ones. Modes available include:

  • Let’s Cook – Even if you make mistakes Mama will help you complete the recipe so you can continue cooking.
  • Let’s Eat – You’re on your own without Mama’s help. Now it’s just you, the food and your hard-to-satisfy friends who will try out your creations and judge you based on how they taste. Mistakes made during preparation will affect the final taste so use caution in the kitchen
  • Combine and Create – Mama’s been teaching you for some time now, and she’s decided it’s time for you to exercise your creative muscle. Take steps and ingredients from different recipes and create your very own concoctions.
  • Let’s Shop – Did you ever wonder where Mama gets all those fantastic ingredients? Head to the store to pick up the things you’ll need to prepare so many delicious dishes.
  • Time Challenge – Play against up to 3 friends using local Wi-Fi play. Face-off in timed cooking challenges to determine who is the fastest chef
  • Picture Diary – Keep a scrapbook of your favorite dishes in this digital picture diary.

Key Game Features

  • Create 80 new recipes including: chili con carne, mushroom quiche, Eggs Benedict, tulip chicken, pumpkin gnocchi, and many more.
  • Use the stylus as your ultimate cooking utensil to chop, grate, slice, stir, spread, sprinkle, roll, and much more in over 200 different mini-games.
  • Six gameplay modes including new additions to the series.
  • Recipes progress from simple to complex, from small to large dishes, so do your best to meet Mama’s expectations and impress your friends. If your friends think your dish is delicious, you’ll unlock another new friend.
  • Earn bronze, silver, and gold medals from Mama based on the quality of your cooking.
  • Multiplayer support for up to four players in single-card DS wireless download play.

List Price: $ 19.99

Price: $ 16.97

How to Shop for Healthy Foods : Eating Healthy with Smaller Portions

Americans love to eat, but being healthy starts with smaller portions!Learn how to shop for healthy foods to improve your diet and nutrition in this free video. Expert: Lisa La Barr Bio: Lisa La Barr is AFPA certified, a WAPF member, and a personal nutrition and wellness expert in Beverly Hills. Filmmaker: Nili Nathan

Victorian Butcher’s Shop c.1900

Victorian Butcher’s Shop c.1900
Healthy Food For Children
Image by brizzle born and bred
image above: Unlocated. Butcher’s Hanging Meat Display.E.1900s.

The photograph below shows the carcasses of a local Bristol butcher (name & location unknown).

It was probably taken in early 1900 and shows the freshly butchered animals made ready for sale at Christmas.

For many of the poorer families fresh meat was something they could only rarely afford so they would save up to treat themselves at Christmas.

The Victorians valued good cooking and food. However, there were great differences between what the rich and poorer people ate. The rich ate a tremendous amount and wasted even more.

This wastage was at a time when a large proportion of the population were living on bread, dripping, vegetables and tea. The diet of the very poor was terrible. The unemployed, and others with little money, survived on little more than potato parings, rotten vegetable refuse and scraps.

For the destitute, hunger often forced them to seek a place in the workhouse where a diet of potatoes, cheese, bread and gruel was provided.

In Victorian times butchers would hang their carcasses in a prominent place to to entice people into their shops.

Whereas now we eat meat within a few days of the animal being slaughtered, then it was the custom to let the meat "hang" for several days or longer.

This was said to improve the flavour.

What’s for Dinner ?

Everything in the 1950s was better, right? Everyone knew their neighbours. You could leave your bike unchained and no one would nick it. Food was more wholesome. Those were the salad days… Well, the boiled potato days, anyway. Those were the golden days before prawn cocktail-flavoured crisps, fast food, ready meals and grazing sullied the good old British diet, and the obesity epidemic took hold.

Due to the economic strain of the Second World War, food was rationed in Britain from 1940 until 1954. As tough as these times were, rationing meant people were forced to follow a lower fat, lower sugar diet. They stayed slimmer as a result and had lower rates of heart disease.

Each person was limited to the following per week: 2oz of sweets – equivalent to one bar of Dairy Milk 2oz cheese – two matchboxsized pieces of Cheddar Approx 540g meat – roughly two chicken breasts and one small steak, meaning many meals had to be meat-free Sugar, jam, biscuits, eggs, cooking fat and dairy products were also strictly rationed.

More than half of all adults in the UK are now overweight or obese. And obesity among children leapt by 25 per cent between 1995 and 2002. The Government is in despair. There have been calls to put a tax on junk food, to ban it from schools, to restrict the advertising of less healthy foods to children and even to put warning labels on food.

Much of what we eat is a part of our culture and it’s strongly influenced by the types of foods we can grow locally. So meat and dairy products, bread and potatoes continue to be important even if, for some of us, they now tend to be in the form of hamburgers and frozen chips rather than the traditional roast beef and boiled potatoes.

Although the main components of the British diet haven’t changed, what has changed is how we put them together and what we add to them.

The main constituents are still basically bread, milk, meat and potatoes. But it’s still relatively low in fruit and veg and we’re eating less fish now than we did in the 1940s and 1950s.

Here is a more detailed look at some of the changes in our eating habits that have taken place since the early 1950s: During the Second World War people were encouraged to drink milk because of its high nutritional value, and this was particularly important for children. Our high consumption of milk continued until the mid-1970s, but since then we’ve been drinking less milk.

This is partly because other drinks, and particularly soft drinks, have become more popular. But the good news is that we’re now choosing more skimmed and semi-skimmed milk than whole milk.

While we’re eating about the same amount of cheese and cream as we used to, yoghurt has been increasing in popularity since it became available in the 1970s.

The number of eggs we eat peaked in the mid-60s and has been declining since. We now eat less than half the number of eggs we ate in the mid 1950s and 1960s.

When the Queen was crowned in 1953, food rationing was still in force, supermarkets were unheard of, and fish and chips were our undisputed national dish. How things have changed. But is our diet more healthy now than it was then?

The 60s were also the period when the British began their long-held love affair with shopping, as supermarkets and shopping centres were built. For many this transformed the weekly shop. But for some, there simply wasn’t the money to go on a spending spree.

The 1960s is renowned for being a decade of change, with different foods and cooking habits being introduced into the kitchen.

As people started to take the first package holidays, inspiration was brought home in the form of dishes like spaghetti Bolognese.

The gradual growth of Indian and Chinese communities, and the subsequent arrival of Indian and Chinese takeaways and restaurants, heralded the beginning of British people’s taste for these cuisines.

But fish and chips remained the nation’s favourite dish.

From the 1970s we began to eat less vegetables despite the fact that the birth of freezers meant that choice was no longer limited by season. Red meat was dished up on a regular basis, with the average person consuming 450g per week compared to just 247g today.

Fruit juice was a healthy arrival but only 12% of people drank it in the 1970s, whereas today the average person has 303ml per week.

Food facts

For the first time, in 1974, the large sliced white loaf began to be sold in plastic bags, so waxed paper was on the way out.

Smash, the instant dried mashed potato, was immortalised in a TV advert in which creatures from Mars laughed at the idea of digging up potatoes from the ground, peeling them, then cooking and mashing them.

But now Smash itself is old-fashioned compared to the revolution in convenience foods that has come since.

The 1970s was also a decade of high inflation and economic uncertainty. Fluctuations in world trade led to a sugar and paper shortage in 1974, while strikes led to occasional disruption of supplies to some shops.

Shopping

Frozen food became more widely eaten as the number of homes with freezers grew rapidly.

Two out of five households owned a freezer by 1979. New products were developed, such as boil-in-the-bag fish, though not all innovations survived the test of time.

Ready-prepared frozen foods, such as lasagne, chicken korma and gateaux, became popular.

Spending on food was down to about a quarter of the average family’s income. But the shopping revolution continued.

Supermarkets grew bigger, and more superstores began to appear, driving out local shops.

The growth in car ownership encouraged people to do a large shop once a week, so large car parks had to be provided.

The number of grocery stores continued to fall, from almost 150,000 in 1961 to only 60,000 in 1981.

The number of people taking foreign holidays continued to grow, fuelling interest in dishes from abroad. Sainsbury’s recorded growing demand in its stores for pizzas, fresh pasta, German bio-yoghurt, extra virgin olive oil, French bread and American ice cream.

A second wave of Indian restaurants was set up, partly stimulated by the independence struggle of East Pakistan that led to the setting up of the state of Bangladesh.

The trends towards more cosmopolitan eating were partly blamed for the decline in popularity of school meals.

Children wanted more choice and snack foods were competing with the meat and two veg on offer in the school dining room.

The golden age of school dinners came to an end in 1980. Local authorities were no longer required to provide meals for all children, though many continued to do so.

The authorities’ only duty was to provide free school meals for children from families with low incomes.

When Delia Smith first graced our TV screens, home cooking was declining but she wanted to get British people back in the kitchen by demonstrating basic cookery techniques. Since then, the enduring popularity of her no-nonsense approach has taken her career from strength to strength.

People became more health conscious in the 1980s. Pasta, which is low in fat and a good source of carbohydrates, really took off.

It was also the decade of speed – the birth of the microwave meant that meals could be ready in minutes.

In some ways this was a decade of contradictions: on the one hand we saw the popularity of delicate nouvelle cuisine and yet this was also the decade that the hamburger took off in the UK.

Today we can literally eat a different nation’s cuisine every day of the week.

The influence of Thailand on our food, for instance, can be strongly felt and people in Britain have developed a real taste for the aromatic flavours of Thai-influenced cuisine.

But alongside the growth in international cuisine, it’s interesting to see the revival of old British favourites with a contemporary twist – traditional sweets such as bread and butter pudding, and even offal dishes, are emerging on restaurant menus.

The potential is there to eat healthier than ever before – it’s just a matter of choice.

Classic dishes such as toad in the hole, bubble and squeak and hot pots are dying out are diasppearing from the family dinner table.

Bread and dripping was popular in the interwar years, especially among poor families hit by unemployment. Such families could not afford to waste any food, including the by products of any meat they were lucky enough to be able to buy. Dripping could also be bought at the butchers. Old-fashioned chip shops used to fry their chips in beef dripping. Today it has fallen out of favour as it is considered very unhealthy.

It’s fair to say tripe doesn’t have the best of reputations. It may have very few calories and be packed with more protein than a piece of steak, but there the attraction ends for many.

Few would relish the thought of tucking into a plate of gelatinous cow’s stomach – no matter how well disguised.

Top foods for dinner 50 years ago

1. Stew and dumplings

2. Liver and onions

3. Toad in the hole

4. Bubble and squeak

5. Hot pot

6. Jacket Potatoes

7. Oxtail soup

8. Faggots

9. Gammon

10. Cornish pasties

Top foods for dinner now

1. Roast dinner

2. Jacket potatoes

3. Spaghetti Bolognese

4. Pizza

5. Salad

6. Lasagne

7. Curry

8. Fish and chips

9. Pasta bake

10. Stir fry