2009 VPP Flag Presentation

2009 VPP Flag Presentation
Occupational Health And Safety
Image by heraldpost
Hershell Wolfe, principal assistant to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army (Environment, Safety and Occupational Health), praises the U.S. Army Garrison Kaiserslatuern’s Safety Office and leadership for earning the Star Status or highest level by the Department of Defense Voluntary Protection Programs Center of Excellence in his speech at the DOD VPP Flag Presentation July 10 at the Armstrong Community Club on Vogelweh Housing. Wolfe stressed that USAGK the first Department of Defense and Army site overseas to achieve Star-site validation of the installation safety and health management system comparable to the U.S. Department of Labor?s Occupational Safety and Health Administration criteria. Photo by Christine June, USAG Kaiserslautern.

2009 VPP Flag Presentation

2009 VPP Flag Presentation
Occupational Health And Safety
Image by heraldpost
The U.S. Army Garrison Kaiserslautern’s Safety Manager Melissa Hastings introduces the guest speaker, Hershell Wolfe, principal assistant to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army (Environment, Safety and Occupational Health), talks about how U.S. Army Garrison Kaiserslatuern earned the Star Status or highest level by the Department of Defense Voluntary Protection Programs Center of Excellence in his speech at the DOD VPP Flag Presentation July 10 at the Armstrong Community Club on Vogelweh Housing. Wolfe stressed that USAGK the first Department of Defense and Army site overseas to achieve Star-site validation of the installation safety and health management system comparable to the U.S. Department of Labor?s Occupational Safety and Health Administration criteria. Photo by Christine June, USAG Kaiserslautern.

Dimitry Orlov Presentation

Dimitry Orlov Presentation
Crash Diets
Image by Earthworm
Dimitry Orlov (at the podium) seen here with the host from The Long Now Foundation. His talk was called Best Practices for Collapse because, as he wryly pointed out, predictions are useless once they come true and he wants to offer something more useful from what others have already experienced. He opened his talk by cautioning that predictions, including his own should be given an error margin of half a decade or so, but so far he has been remarkably spot on.

Dimitry’s 2006 presentation on the collapse gap, in which he compares the demise of the USSR with what he predicted would be a similar collapse in the US, captured my imagination a couple of years ago and set me on my long study of the phenomena of civilizations collapsing. I had also read his book (and reviewed it). So I was thrilled to actually see Dimitry in person and introduce Catherine to his perspective.

Though not a charismatic speaker and reading from a prepared script, Dimitry peppered his talk with amusing concepts and references to popular notions ie: thinking outside of the box. He urged escaping from the box altogether.

Once collapse happens, he explained, what was the measure of our success before collapse is turned around post collapse. For instance having a high inventory is
considered bad business practice in this era of on demand supply, but after collapse, inventory is what will be needed once supply lines are down. And where once a lean staff was prudent, post collapse, a slow bureaucratic staff would save you. Customer service, now a mark of a good company, will turn out to have spoiled the population and rendered them unable to figure things out for themselves post collapse. He pointed out that all this economic activity was a burden on our ecology and what is crashing now is our life support system. So the governemnt should forget about stimulating it with growth and jobs and focus on food, shelter, transportation and security. He then proceeded to offer suggestions.

Food: Supermarkets will empty out in a matter of days, but fast food joints will be able to carry on a little longer given that they control their own supply lines, if you can call what they offer food. What we will need is for everyone to have access to 1,000 sq ft of fertile land near a water source with transportation for the seasonal migration needed for everyone to get out there to plant and to harvest. And as there will be fewer people driving, raised highways could be used for rainwater catchment.

Shelter: Office buildings, which will empty out post collapse, can be handily converted to dorms. They already have bathrooms and kitchens lacking only beds. He referred to the workers as office plankton which got a laugh. American colleges, are already a dubious endeavor given the burden of student loans. Post collapse few will be able to qualify, leaving campuses empty. This will provide us with housing opportunity. Said campuses already provided with lots of lawns, will also offer food growing opportunity. He slipped in a sly comment about how the American education system does not manage to do in 12 years what the Russians do in 8.

He commented on how the price of housing hangs on a huge assumption that a single family dwelling is required and it was still possible to see housing prices drop and become the liability of banks as they fight squatters. He suggested having the bank hire you to housesit and maintain these properties once they kick you out for not paying the mortgage owing to hyperinflation. He suggested that shelter can include mobile homes, teepees, shipping containers, etc.

Transportation: Since this sector hinges on fuel it’s best not to use any thus cargo bicycles and sailboats. He did think that there would still be cars and trucks and that it should be illegal not to pick up hitchikers. His suggestion that the sale of new cars be banned was met with applause as he described how this would use the embodied energy in cars already made, boost the locally based repair economy and result in fewer cars overall, disappearing altogether just as we run out of gas. There was no point in subsidizng the manufacture of more fuel efficient cars, he said, because you can make any existing pick-up truck ten to twenty times more efficient by packing 20 people standing up in the back and driving no faster than 25 mph. He mentioned that Mexico is already expert at this (and so is Thailand). Big laugh here. He also suggested that freight trains be required to have one empty boxcar for those wishing to ride the rails. But best of all were donkeys. Not horses—too neurotic. He told us about his uncle who fed his donkey his subscription of Pravda and commented that ours would do just as well on a daily diet of the Wall Street Journal. The audience loved that one.

Security: Here the going gets a bit nastier for there will be an increase in crime, but luckily there will be an increase in out of work police and soldiers who will wish to freelance for you to hire them or befriend them and offer them the use of your house while you and your family move into your garage. He pointed out that because force will be the means by which things are done legal or not, there would be no need for a legal system. Thus you can violate local building codes, homeowner rules and other local laws with impunity, installing wind turbines, have livestock in your garage and operate a home business in weaponry invention. His own preference in weaponry was an AK 47 because its easy to get bullets for it.

The point was to accept failure now and prepare. Those hanging on to the old system will suffer individual failure later. He does indeed live on a boat, with his wife, having made his decision to sell his Boston condo 2 1/2 years ago once he recognized that a US collapse was a likely possibility. He said the New Yorker got his number when they called him a bourgeois survivalist. He walks to work to an office building 15 minutes away. He declined to say how else he had prepared, but I left thinking of things I would want to stockpile. I was intrigued at what a normal San Francisco crowd this was and how accepting they were of his concepts. Their questions reflected this too. I was expecting more of an anarchistic, libertarian lot sporting tatoos and mohawks. Or at least the very lean peak oil sorts on bicycles (and there were some). This audience was rather more intellectual, middle aged and middle class which is what we are. Nor was it male dominated with quite a lot of women taking notes.

Safety Award Presentation

Safety Award Presentation
Occupational Health And Safety
Image by USACEpublicaffairs
BROWNSVILLE, Texas —- Col. Thomas W. Kula, commanding officer of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Southwestern Division, awards Pablo Hernandez, a project engineer in the Brownsville office, with a Certificate of Achievement in Safety for exceptional achievement in support of the Commander’s Safety and Occupational Health Program. Hernandez oversaw 225,000 contractor work hours in fiscal year 2010 without any lost time accidents. (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers photo by Sandra Arnold)

Instant interactivity: Put a PowerPoint presentation in your blog – Mom 2.0 Summit 2011

Bloggers who want new, creative ways to share information and engage their readers are taking advantage of PowerPoint and Excel Web Apps to put interactive presentations and spreadsheets online.

2009 VPP Flag Presentation

2009 VPP Flag Presentation
occupational health and safety
Image by heraldpost
Hershell Wolfe, principal assistant to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army (Environment, Safety and Occupational Health), talks about how U.S. Army Garrison Kaiserslatuern earned the Star Status or highest level by the Department of Defense Voluntary Protection Programs Center of Excellence in his speech at the DOD VPP Flag Presentation July 10 at the Armstrong Community Club on Vogelweh Housing. Wolfe stressed that USAGK the first Department of Defense and Army site overseas to achieve Star-site validation of the installation safety and health management system comparable to the U.S. Department of Labor?s Occupational Safety and Health Administration criteria. Photo by Christine June, USAG Kaiserslautern.

80+1 / Project presentation HAK Steyr

80+1 / Project presentation HAK Steyr
healthy eating habits
Image by Ars Electronica
Students of the HAK Steyr and the International School of Buenos Aires are discussing various aspects of food: production of foodstuffs, healthy nutrition, and the hunger crisis. And they’ll also be comparing Austrian eating habits with those prevalent in Buenos Aires.

credit: Karl Piaty, BHAK Steyr

80+1 / Project presentation HAK Steyr

80+1 / Project presentation HAK Steyr
healthy eating habits
Image by Ars Electronica
Students of the HAK Steyr and the International School of Buenos Aires are discussing various aspects of food: production of foodstuffs, healthy nutrition, and the hunger crisis. And they’ll also be comparing Austrian eating habits with those prevalent in Buenos Aires.

credit: Richard Baldinger