Kale & Quinoa Crustless Quiche: Christmas Morning Breakfast

Gingerbread Pancakes? Eggs Bene Strata? Homemade Granola? Watch more breakfast recipe videos as part of the Christmas Morning Breakfast Playlist & Subscribe below. SarahFit TV: www.youtube.com EntertainingWithBeth: www.youtube.com Laura Vitale’s Kitchen: www.youtube.com Hungry: www.youtube.com…
Video Rating: 4 / 5

June-Marie Raw Food and Fitness Health Good morning my youtube and Facebook friends!

Please click on my fan page link 🙂 www.facebook.com Hello ! how are you? I am on here to try to help everyone eat better and exercise If you need any help with that email me or call 1 (607) 483-8445 please do not forget to eat raw organic fruit (focusing on the fruit) vegetables (especially dark leafy greens) nuts and seeds and exercise two hours or two miles (walking) a day everyday huge hugs remember you are loved huge hugs dedicating all my videos to my mom who passed on to Heaven April 24, 2012 She will be enormously missed. my heart is happy my soul is free my love for you still stands strong freedom is the answer from far beyond time will change people will see that the answer is nature and natural and that life is to be clean to be happier molding one person at a time will make a happier place for us all. no one has all the answers but the key is to try and be what you were meant to be in the first place stand for what you believe in and go after it full circle love binds us and entwines us as one…. Happiness can be achieved if you follow your chosen dream love JuneMarie P. Liddy
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Smoke Two Joints in the Morning, Smoke Two More at Night, Legalizing Marijuana is the Number One Suggestion in President Obama’s Virtual Suggestion Box

Smoke Two Joints in the Morning, Smoke Two More at Night, Legalizing Marijuana is the Number One Suggestion in President Obama’s Virtual Suggestion Box
Budgeting Tips
Image by Thomas Hawk

The Register published a story yesterday regarding President-Elect Barak Obama’s experiment with a public suggestion box over at change.gov. Change.gov is a sort of government suggestion box where people can ask questions or offer suggestions to the newly elected President that supposedly he’s going to consider. Users on the site can vote suggestions up or down. And the top suggestion amongst the thousands offered to the new President. Yep, you got it, people wanna get high, legally.

From the Register:

"Obama’s Change.gov site will close down its internet suggestion box today, after a week of taking suggestions and opinions on the new administration’s executive policy from the web public at large. In standard Web 2.0 fashion, users can vote up or down on existing entries — the theory being that the best schemes will rise to top.

Supposedly, the "top ideas" will be presented directly to the new Commander-in-chief in the form of a "Citizen’s Briefing Book" following his inauguration on January 20.

Barring any massive last-minute changes, the tip-top idea will be best summarized by the philosopher/poet Chris Tucker in his cinematic role as Smokey: "I’m gunna get you high today, ’cause it’s Friday; you ain’t got no job…and you ain’t got shit to do."

There are lots of other interesting ideas that the general public has come up with including suggestions for bullet trains and light rail, ending Govt sponsored abstinence programs, creating a more green country, etc. But top of the list is legalizing pot.

Barack Obama of course is the first President who has admitted that he smoked pot in the past and actually inhaled frequently because "that was the point."

With the budget woes that are currently facing the country, certainly legalizing marijuana could provide for a windfall of Government revenue. It was largely the need for tax revenues that got the government to end the prohibition against alcohol back after the Great Depression. In an interesting editorial in the San Francisco Chronicle last week the tax benefits of legalizing marijuana were raised once again with the argument being made that the State of California could possibly address our current budget woes by a tax on the popular drug:

"The marijuana crop is valued at .8 billion annually – nearly double the value of our vegetable and grape crops combined. Our state is the nation’s top marijuana producer. Indeed, the average annual value of our marijuana crop is more than the combined value of wheat and cotton produced in the entire United States.

According to government surveys, 14.5 million Americans use marijuana at least monthly but both the producers and consumers of this crop escape paying any taxes whatsoever on it. While precise figures are impossible given the illicit nature of the market, it is reasonable to suggest that California could easily collect at least .5 billion and maybe as much as billion annually in additional tax revenue, if we took marijuana out of the criminal underground and taxed and regulated it, similar to how handle beer, wine and tobacco."

It will be interesting what our new President has to say about legalizing marijuana if he has the political gumption to actually broach the subject. Certainly almost 100,000 people on the internet have. One person though who it looks like doesn’t support marijuana legalization is Obama’s pick for Surgeon General, Sanjay Gupta.

Sleepy Morning. Marsh Mallow, Waltheria americana ….Hoàn Tiên ( Hoàng Tiền ), Xà Bà ….#3

Sleepy Morning. Marsh Mallow, Waltheria americana ….Hoàn Tiên ( Hoàng Tiền ), Xà Bà ….#3
Natural Health Tips
Image by Vietnam Plants & America plants
Vietnamese named : Hoàn Tiên ( Hoàng Tiền ), Xà Bà
Common names : Sleepy Morning, Marsh Mallow, Buf Coat, Velvet leaf, Basona Prieta Leather coat, Monkey bush , Uhaloa
Scientist name : Waltheria americana L.
Synonyms : Waltheria indica Linn, Waltheria elliptica
Family : Sterculiaceae . Họ Trôm

Links :

**** yhoccotruyen.vn/index.php?option=com_content&view=art…

Xà bà, Hoàn tiên – Waltheria americana L. (W.indica L.), thuộc họ Trôm – Sterculiaceae.

Mô tả: Cây thảo hay cây bụi thấp, chỉ cao 35-150cm. Lá có phiến xoan, dài 2-4,2cm, rộng 1,2-2,2cm, màu lục tươi, có lông hình sao như nhung màu trắng; cuống mảnh có lông, lá kèm hình sợi. Cụm hoa xim có hình cầu ở nách lá. Hoa nhiều, nhỏ, màu vàng; đài có lông dày; cánh hoa dài 4-5mm, nhị 5 dính thành bẹ nhẵn; bầu thụt vào trong, vòi có lông hình sao; đầu nhụy thành bó có 25 cành. Quả rất nhỏ, hình chùy; hạt đơn độc màu đen, có lông.

Ra hoa kết quả tháng 11 đến tháng 6.

Bộ phận dùng: Rễ, thân – Radix et Caulis Waltheriae Americanae.

Nơi sống và thu hái: Loài của toàn thế giới nhiệt đới. Thường gặp phổ biến trên đất hoang, dọc đường đi vùng đồng bằng khắp nước ta.

Tính vị, tác dụng: Vị cay, hơi ngọt, tính bình; có tác dụng khư thấp, khu phong, tiêu viêm, giải độc.

Công dụng, chỉ định và phối hợp: Ở Vân Nam (Trung Quốc) dùng làm thuốc hạ tiêu, bạch đới, mụn nhọt ghẻ lở và viêm tuyến vú.

Ở Malaixia , cây được xem như là làm dịu và long đờm, được dùng chữa ho.

Ở Philippin, cây dùng làm thuốc hạ sốt và trị giang mai.

Ở Nam Phi, phụ nữ dùng nước sắc rễ uống chữa vô sinh, cơ thể gầy yếu.

(Theo lrc-hueuni.edu.vn)

**** www.thaythuoccuaban.com/vithuoc/xaba.htm

_________________________________________________________

**** www.tropilab.com/waltheriatincture.html
Overview

A tropical shrub, the whole plant (roots, leaves, buds and flowers) is used against chronic asthma.
This plant has anti inflammatory and antifungal properties.
Other uses include: cortex (root bark); chewed as a very effective natural medicine for sore throat.
Internally for arthritis, neuralgia, common cold, cough, bronchial phlegm or mucous, diarrhea, eye baths, fatigue; used as a bitter tonic.
Waltheria is used in Brazil against bronchitis and for cleaning difficult healing wounds.
Used in the Caribbean for bladder infections.
This is one of the best plant medicines for sore throats and a good herb for bronchial or bacterial infections.

Phytochemicals

Mucilage, tannin, peptide alkaloids, adouetin X,Y,Y1, and Z, Quercetin.

Pharmacology

In a study of several extracts from different species, five species, including Waltheria (roots and aerial parts) demonstrated moderate antiplasmodial activity.
Study of crude extracts from 17 species showed Waltheria to have promising in vitro bactericidal activity against Pneumococcus, including penicillin-resistant strains.
In a study three flavonoids were from the whole plant of Waltheria. The flavonoids showed significant dose-dependent inhibition of the production of inflammatory mediator NO, cytokines (TNF-a) and interleukin (IL-12) in activated macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity. The findings support the use of this plant for inflammatory diseases.
Quercetin is a ubiquitous bioflavonoid* with powerful activity against the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophages stimulated by lipo-polysaccharide.
A mixture of bioflavonoids from Waltheria americana a plant used for centuries in India for inflammatory disorders, was found to significantly and dose-dependently inhibit the production of the nitric oxide (NO) and the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-a and interleukin (IL)-12, in lipopolysaccharide and g interferon activated murine peritoneal macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity (cytotoxicity means being toxic to cells).
The major constituent of extracts of this was quercetin.
The flavenoid constituents 5,2?, 5?- trihydroxy-3,7,4?-trimethoxyflavone and 5,2,?-dihydroxy-3,7,4?,5?- tetramethoxyflavone show strong antifungal activity.

*Bioflavonoids are a large, heterogeneous group of pigmented plant molecules; they may have emerged because of their ability to cope with the immense free radical load associated with photosynthesis.
They are polyphenols, but beyond that they have a wide structural diversity.
Over 4000 bioflavonoids have so far been described.

Dosage

Infusion: 1 – 2 cups daily
Tincture: 1 – 2 ml. daily (1 – 2 full droppers)

Interaction / side effects

There are no interactions and/or side-effects known.

Reference

National Tropical Botanical Garden (NTBG). n.d. ‘Uhaloa. In Native Hawaiian plant information sheets. Lawai, Kauai: Hawaii Plant Conservation Center. National Tropical Botanical Garden. Unpublished internal papers.
Stratton, Lisa, Leslie Hudson, Nova Suenaga, and Barrie Morgan. 1998. Overview of Hawaiian dry forest propagation techniques. Newsletter of the Hawaiian Botanical Society 37 (2):13, 15-27.
Wagner, Warren L., Darrel R. Herbst, and S. H. Sohmer. 1990. Manual of the flowering plants of Hawai’i. 2 vols., Bishop Museum Special Publication 83. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press and Bishop Museum Press. p. 1280
Antidiarrhoeal activity of Waltheria americana, Commelina coelestis and Alternanthera repens.
Zavala MA, Perez S, Perez C, Vargas R, Perez RM.
Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, Mexico DF, Mexico

The above presentation is for informational and educational purposes only.
It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage.
For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over – the – counter medication is also available.
Consult your doctor, practitioner, and / or pharmacist for any health problem and before using dietary supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications.

**** www.tropilab.com/sleepy-waltheria.html
Synonyms
Waltheria indica, Waltheria elliptica.
Common name
Sleepy morning, uhaloa, hierba de soldado, guasimilla, uha-loa, velvet leaf, malvavisco, marsh-mallow, buff coat, leather coat, monkey bush, basora prieta, escobillo blanco, malvavisco, chamorro.
Family
Sterculiaceae (Cacao family).

Overview
Uhaloa is a common tropical weed in the savannas of Suriname. It grows up to 6 feet tall and the plant mostly branches near the ground.
The whole plant is tomentose hairy while the serrate alternate leaves are bright green; underneath gray.
These leaves have conspicuous veins.
The fragrant flowers, growing in dense clusters in leaf axils, are yellow.
The small seed capsules hold one shiny black seed each.

Medicinal applications
In Polynesia the root bark (cortex) is chewed upon for sore throat, while in Hawaii it is used internally for arthritis, neuralgia and chronic cases of asthma.
An infusion of stem and leaves is also used.
Used against the common cold, diarrhea, unwanted pregnancy, painful menstruation and fatigue.

Pharmacology
There is a possible presence of tannins; the plant is antibacterial and vericidal.
The leaves and buds are smoked to get a legal high.

Visit our CHOLESTEROL -, DIABETES – , HYPERTENSION – and TINCTURE pages.

Hardiness
USDA zone 9 B – 11.
Propagation
Seeds.
Culture
Full sun, grows well on poor soils; can withstand draught.
Plant in frost free spots or after the danger of frost has past.

**** www.stuartxchange.org/Barulad.html

Botany
Barulad is an erect, more or less branched, hairy, shrubby or half woody plant, 0.5 to 1.5 meters high. Leaves are oblong-ovate or oblong, 3.5 to 9 cm long, rounded or blunt at the tip, slightly heart-shaped at the base, with toothed margins. Flowers are yellow, sweet-scented, about 5 mm long, borne on dense, shortly peduncled fascicles at the axils of the leaves.

Distribution
A common weed, in dry places in the settled areas, at low and medium altitudes.

Constituents
Yields mucilage, tannin and sugar.

Properties
Plant considered astringent.
Considered febrifuge and antisyphilitic.
Root considered purgative.

Parts used
Parts used.

Uses
Folkloric
Used for fever and syphilis.
Decoction used as remedy for eruptions of the skin and for washing wounds.
Decoction given to infants, to drink or inhale, at teething.
In Togo and Yoruba, infusion is given as drink and wash, to strengthen a child’s resistance against fevers.
Among the Hausas. used as purgative; decoction used as syphilis prevention or immunity.
Used by farmers as a restorative drink for the labors of harvesting.
In Togo, spoonful of the pulverized plant in hot water, taken morning and evening as cough medicine.
In the Gold Coast, used as abortifacient.
In South Africa, root used as remedy for sterility and as astringent for internal hemorrhages.
In the Antilles, used as emollient.
In West Africa, decoction of roots and leaves, used for washing wounds. In the Ivory Coast, decoction of roots also used as aphrodisiac.
In Nigeria, decoction of roots or chewing of fresh roots used for internal hemorrhage.
Others
Cosmetics: Extract has reported use in several cosmetic products – moisturizers, skin lightening, anti-aging.

Studies
• Anti-Inflammatory / Flavonoids: Study isolated three flavonoids from the whole plant of Waltheria indica. The flavonoids showed significant dose-dependent inhibition of the production of inflammatory mediator NO, cytokines (TNF-a) and interleukin (IL-12) in activated macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity. Findings support the use of W indica for inflammatory diseases.
• Anti-Pneumococcal: Study of 221 crude extracts from 17 species showed 7 from 6 plants, including Waltheria indica, to have promising in vitro bactericidal activity against Pneumococcus, including penicillin-resistant strains. Results suppport its traditional use in the treatment of pneumococcal infections.
• Anti-Plasmodial: In a study of 13 extracts from 8 different species, five species, including W indica (roots and aerial parts) demonstrated moderate antiplasmodial activity.
Availability
Wild-crafted.
Tinctures and extracts in the cybermarket.

Make Yourself Wake Up Early: How to Get Up in the Morning When You Feel Like Hitting Snooze [Article]

Make Yourself Wake Up Early: How to Get Up in the Morning When You Feel Like Hitting Snooze [Article]

Make It Happen

This article will teach you how to consistently wake up early in the morning. This practical, no-fluff guide draws on the author’s personal experience as well as proven behavioral principles. If you want to become a morning person, this is your answer. (Article: 1,734 words).

Price:

Sleepy Morning. Marsh Mallow, Waltheria americana ….Hoàn Tiên ( Hoàng Tiền ), Xà Bà ….#6

Sleepy Morning. Marsh Mallow, Waltheria americana ….Hoàn Tiên ( Hoàng Tiền ), Xà Bà ….#6
Natural Health Tips
Image by Vietnam Plants & America plants
Vietnamese named : Hoàn Tiên ( Hoàng Tiền ), Xà Bà
Common names : Sleepy Morning, Marsh Mallow, Buf Coat, Velvet leaf, Basona Prieta Leather coat, Monkey bush , Uhaloa
Scientist name : Waltheria americana L.
Synonyms : Waltheria indica Linn, Waltheria elliptica
Family : Sterculiaceae . Họ Trôm

Links :

**** yhoccotruyen.vn/index.php?option=com_content&view=art…

Xà bà, Hoàn tiên – Waltheria americana L. (W.indica L.), thuộc họ Trôm – Sterculiaceae.

Mô tả: Cây thảo hay cây bụi thấp, chỉ cao 35-150cm. Lá có phiến xoan, dài 2-4,2cm, rộng 1,2-2,2cm, màu lục tươi, có lông hình sao như nhung màu trắng; cuống mảnh có lông, lá kèm hình sợi. Cụm hoa xim có hình cầu ở nách lá. Hoa nhiều, nhỏ, màu vàng; đài có lông dày; cánh hoa dài 4-5mm, nhị 5 dính thành bẹ nhẵn; bầu thụt vào trong, vòi có lông hình sao; đầu nhụy thành bó có 25 cành. Quả rất nhỏ, hình chùy; hạt đơn độc màu đen, có lông.

Ra hoa kết quả tháng 11 đến tháng 6.

Bộ phận dùng: Rễ, thân – Radix et Caulis Waltheriae Americanae.

Nơi sống và thu hái: Loài của toàn thế giới nhiệt đới. Thường gặp phổ biến trên đất hoang, dọc đường đi vùng đồng bằng khắp nước ta.

Tính vị, tác dụng: Vị cay, hơi ngọt, tính bình; có tác dụng khư thấp, khu phong, tiêu viêm, giải độc.

Công dụng, chỉ định và phối hợp: Ở Vân Nam (Trung Quốc) dùng làm thuốc hạ tiêu, bạch đới, mụn nhọt ghẻ lở và viêm tuyến vú.

Ở Malaixia , cây được xem như là làm dịu và long đờm, được dùng chữa ho.

Ở Philippin, cây dùng làm thuốc hạ sốt và trị giang mai.

Ở Nam Phi, phụ nữ dùng nước sắc rễ uống chữa vô sinh, cơ thể gầy yếu.

(Theo lrc-hueuni.edu.vn)

**** www.thaythuoccuaban.com/vithuoc/xaba.htm

_________________________________________________________

**** www.tropilab.com/waltheriatincture.html
Overview

A tropical shrub, the whole plant (roots, leaves, buds and flowers) is used against chronic asthma.
This plant has anti inflammatory and antifungal properties.
Other uses include: cortex (root bark); chewed as a very effective natural medicine for sore throat.
Internally for arthritis, neuralgia, common cold, cough, bronchial phlegm or mucous, diarrhea, eye baths, fatigue; used as a bitter tonic.
Waltheria is used in Brazil against bronchitis and for cleaning difficult healing wounds.
Used in the Caribbean for bladder infections.
This is one of the best plant medicines for sore throats and a good herb for bronchial or bacterial infections.

Phytochemicals

Mucilage, tannin, peptide alkaloids, adouetin X,Y,Y1, and Z, Quercetin.

Pharmacology

In a study of several extracts from different species, five species, including Waltheria (roots and aerial parts) demonstrated moderate antiplasmodial activity.
Study of crude extracts from 17 species showed Waltheria to have promising in vitro bactericidal activity against Pneumococcus, including penicillin-resistant strains.
In a study three flavonoids were from the whole plant of Waltheria. The flavonoids showed significant dose-dependent inhibition of the production of inflammatory mediator NO, cytokines (TNF-a) and interleukin (IL-12) in activated macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity. The findings support the use of this plant for inflammatory diseases.
Quercetin is a ubiquitous bioflavonoid* with powerful activity against the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophages stimulated by lipo-polysaccharide.
A mixture of bioflavonoids from Waltheria americana a plant used for centuries in India for inflammatory disorders, was found to significantly and dose-dependently inhibit the production of the nitric oxide (NO) and the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-a and interleukin (IL)-12, in lipopolysaccharide and g interferon activated murine peritoneal macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity (cytotoxicity means being toxic to cells).
The major constituent of extracts of this was quercetin.
The flavenoid constituents 5,2?, 5?- trihydroxy-3,7,4?-trimethoxyflavone and 5,2,?-dihydroxy-3,7,4?,5?- tetramethoxyflavone show strong antifungal activity.

*Bioflavonoids are a large, heterogeneous group of pigmented plant molecules; they may have emerged because of their ability to cope with the immense free radical load associated with photosynthesis.
They are polyphenols, but beyond that they have a wide structural diversity.
Over 4000 bioflavonoids have so far been described.

Dosage

Infusion: 1 – 2 cups daily
Tincture: 1 – 2 ml. daily (1 – 2 full droppers)

Interaction / side effects

There are no interactions and/or side-effects known.

Reference

National Tropical Botanical Garden (NTBG). n.d. ‘Uhaloa. In Native Hawaiian plant information sheets. Lawai, Kauai: Hawaii Plant Conservation Center. National Tropical Botanical Garden. Unpublished internal papers.
Stratton, Lisa, Leslie Hudson, Nova Suenaga, and Barrie Morgan. 1998. Overview of Hawaiian dry forest propagation techniques. Newsletter of the Hawaiian Botanical Society 37 (2):13, 15-27.
Wagner, Warren L., Darrel R. Herbst, and S. H. Sohmer. 1990. Manual of the flowering plants of Hawai’i. 2 vols., Bishop Museum Special Publication 83. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press and Bishop Museum Press. p. 1280
Antidiarrhoeal activity of Waltheria americana, Commelina coelestis and Alternanthera repens.
Zavala MA, Perez S, Perez C, Vargas R, Perez RM.
Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, Mexico DF, Mexico

The above presentation is for informational and educational purposes only.
It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage.
For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over – the – counter medication is also available.
Consult your doctor, practitioner, and / or pharmacist for any health problem and before using dietary supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications.

**** www.tropilab.com/sleepy-waltheria.html
Synonyms
Waltheria indica, Waltheria elliptica.
Common name
Sleepy morning, uhaloa, hierba de soldado, guasimilla, uha-loa, velvet leaf, malvavisco, marsh-mallow, buff coat, leather coat, monkey bush, basora prieta, escobillo blanco, malvavisco, chamorro.
Family
Sterculiaceae (Cacao family).

Overview
Uhaloa is a common tropical weed in the savannas of Suriname. It grows up to 6 feet tall and the plant mostly branches near the ground.
The whole plant is tomentose hairy while the serrate alternate leaves are bright green; underneath gray.
These leaves have conspicuous veins.
The fragrant flowers, growing in dense clusters in leaf axils, are yellow.
The small seed capsules hold one shiny black seed each.

Medicinal applications
In Polynesia the root bark (cortex) is chewed upon for sore throat, while in Hawaii it is used internally for arthritis, neuralgia and chronic cases of asthma.
An infusion of stem and leaves is also used.
Used against the common cold, diarrhea, unwanted pregnancy, painful menstruation and fatigue.

Pharmacology
There is a possible presence of tannins; the plant is antibacterial and vericidal.
The leaves and buds are smoked to get a legal high.

Visit our CHOLESTEROL -, DIABETES – , HYPERTENSION – and TINCTURE pages.

Hardiness
USDA zone 9 B – 11.
Propagation
Seeds.
Culture
Full sun, grows well on poor soils; can withstand draught.
Plant in frost free spots or after the danger of frost has past.

**** www.stuartxchange.org/Barulad.html

Botany
Barulad is an erect, more or less branched, hairy, shrubby or half woody plant, 0.5 to 1.5 meters high. Leaves are oblong-ovate or oblong, 3.5 to 9 cm long, rounded or blunt at the tip, slightly heart-shaped at the base, with toothed margins. Flowers are yellow, sweet-scented, about 5 mm long, borne on dense, shortly peduncled fascicles at the axils of the leaves.

Distribution
A common weed, in dry places in the settled areas, at low and medium altitudes.

Constituents
Yields mucilage, tannin and sugar.

Properties
Plant considered astringent.
Considered febrifuge and antisyphilitic.
Root considered purgative.

Parts used
Parts used.

Uses
Folkloric
Used for fever and syphilis.
Decoction used as remedy for eruptions of the skin and for washing wounds.
Decoction given to infants, to drink or inhale, at teething.
In Togo and Yoruba, infusion is given as drink and wash, to strengthen a child’s resistance against fevers.
Among the Hausas. used as purgative; decoction used as syphilis prevention or immunity.
Used by farmers as a restorative drink for the labors of harvesting.
In Togo, spoonful of the pulverized plant in hot water, taken morning and evening as cough medicine.
In the Gold Coast, used as abortifacient.
In South Africa, root used as remedy for sterility and as astringent for internal hemorrhages.
In the Antilles, used as emollient.
In West Africa, decoction of roots and leaves, used for washing wounds. In the Ivory Coast, decoction of roots also used as aphrodisiac.
In Nigeria, decoction of roots or chewing of fresh roots used for internal hemorrhage.
Others
Cosmetics: Extract has reported use in several cosmetic products – moisturizers, skin lightening, anti-aging.

Studies
• Anti-Inflammatory / Flavonoids: Study isolated three flavonoids from the whole plant of Waltheria indica. The flavonoids showed significant dose-dependent inhibition of the production of inflammatory mediator NO, cytokines (TNF-a) and interleukin (IL-12) in activated macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity. Findings support the use of W indica for inflammatory diseases.
• Anti-Pneumococcal: Study of 221 crude extracts from 17 species showed 7 from 6 plants, including Waltheria indica, to have promising in vitro bactericidal activity against Pneumococcus, including penicillin-resistant strains. Results suppport its traditional use in the treatment of pneumococcal infections.
• Anti-Plasmodial: In a study of 13 extracts from 8 different species, five species, including W indica (roots and aerial parts) demonstrated moderate antiplasmodial activity.
Availability
Wild-crafted.
Tinctures and extracts in the cybermarket.

Sleepy Morning. Marsh Mallow, Waltheria americana ….Hoàn Tiên ( Hoàng Tiền ), Xà Bà ….#5

Sleepy Morning. Marsh Mallow, Waltheria americana ….Hoàn Tiên ( Hoàng Tiền ), Xà Bà ….#5
Natural Health Tips
Image by Vietnam Plants & America plants
Vietnamese named : Hoàn Tiên ( Hoàng Tiền ), Xà Bà
Common names : Sleepy Morning, Marsh Mallow, Buf Coat, Velvet leaf, Basona Prieta Leather coat, Monkey bush , Uhaloa
Scientist name : Waltheria americana L.
Synonyms : Waltheria indica Linn, Waltheria elliptica
Family : Sterculiaceae . Họ Trôm

Links :

**** yhoccotruyen.vn/index.php?option=com_content&view=art…

Xà bà, Hoàn tiên – Waltheria americana L. (W.indica L.), thuộc họ Trôm – Sterculiaceae.

Mô tả: Cây thảo hay cây bụi thấp, chỉ cao 35-150cm. Lá có phiến xoan, dài 2-4,2cm, rộng 1,2-2,2cm, màu lục tươi, có lông hình sao như nhung màu trắng; cuống mảnh có lông, lá kèm hình sợi. Cụm hoa xim có hình cầu ở nách lá. Hoa nhiều, nhỏ, màu vàng; đài có lông dày; cánh hoa dài 4-5mm, nhị 5 dính thành bẹ nhẵn; bầu thụt vào trong, vòi có lông hình sao; đầu nhụy thành bó có 25 cành. Quả rất nhỏ, hình chùy; hạt đơn độc màu đen, có lông.

Ra hoa kết quả tháng 11 đến tháng 6.

Bộ phận dùng: Rễ, thân – Radix et Caulis Waltheriae Americanae.

Nơi sống và thu hái: Loài của toàn thế giới nhiệt đới. Thường gặp phổ biến trên đất hoang, dọc đường đi vùng đồng bằng khắp nước ta.

Tính vị, tác dụng: Vị cay, hơi ngọt, tính bình; có tác dụng khư thấp, khu phong, tiêu viêm, giải độc.

Công dụng, chỉ định và phối hợp: Ở Vân Nam (Trung Quốc) dùng làm thuốc hạ tiêu, bạch đới, mụn nhọt ghẻ lở và viêm tuyến vú.

Ở Malaixia , cây được xem như là làm dịu và long đờm, được dùng chữa ho.

Ở Philippin, cây dùng làm thuốc hạ sốt và trị giang mai.

Ở Nam Phi, phụ nữ dùng nước sắc rễ uống chữa vô sinh, cơ thể gầy yếu.

(Theo lrc-hueuni.edu.vn)

**** www.thaythuoccuaban.com/vithuoc/xaba.htm

_________________________________________________________

**** www.tropilab.com/waltheriatincture.html
Overview

A tropical shrub, the whole plant (roots, leaves, buds and flowers) is used against chronic asthma.
This plant has anti inflammatory and antifungal properties.
Other uses include: cortex (root bark); chewed as a very effective natural medicine for sore throat.
Internally for arthritis, neuralgia, common cold, cough, bronchial phlegm or mucous, diarrhea, eye baths, fatigue; used as a bitter tonic.
Waltheria is used in Brazil against bronchitis and for cleaning difficult healing wounds.
Used in the Caribbean for bladder infections.
This is one of the best plant medicines for sore throats and a good herb for bronchial or bacterial infections.

Phytochemicals

Mucilage, tannin, peptide alkaloids, adouetin X,Y,Y1, and Z, Quercetin.

Pharmacology

In a study of several extracts from different species, five species, including Waltheria (roots and aerial parts) demonstrated moderate antiplasmodial activity.
Study of crude extracts from 17 species showed Waltheria to have promising in vitro bactericidal activity against Pneumococcus, including penicillin-resistant strains.
In a study three flavonoids were from the whole plant of Waltheria. The flavonoids showed significant dose-dependent inhibition of the production of inflammatory mediator NO, cytokines (TNF-a) and interleukin (IL-12) in activated macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity. The findings support the use of this plant for inflammatory diseases.
Quercetin is a ubiquitous bioflavonoid* with powerful activity against the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophages stimulated by lipo-polysaccharide.
A mixture of bioflavonoids from Waltheria americana a plant used for centuries in India for inflammatory disorders, was found to significantly and dose-dependently inhibit the production of the nitric oxide (NO) and the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-a and interleukin (IL)-12, in lipopolysaccharide and g interferon activated murine peritoneal macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity (cytotoxicity means being toxic to cells).
The major constituent of extracts of this was quercetin.
The flavenoid constituents 5,2?, 5?- trihydroxy-3,7,4?-trimethoxyflavone and 5,2,?-dihydroxy-3,7,4?,5?- tetramethoxyflavone show strong antifungal activity.

*Bioflavonoids are a large, heterogeneous group of pigmented plant molecules; they may have emerged because of their ability to cope with the immense free radical load associated with photosynthesis.
They are polyphenols, but beyond that they have a wide structural diversity.
Over 4000 bioflavonoids have so far been described.

Dosage

Infusion: 1 – 2 cups daily
Tincture: 1 – 2 ml. daily (1 – 2 full droppers)

Interaction / side effects

There are no interactions and/or side-effects known.

Reference

National Tropical Botanical Garden (NTBG). n.d. ‘Uhaloa. In Native Hawaiian plant information sheets. Lawai, Kauai: Hawaii Plant Conservation Center. National Tropical Botanical Garden. Unpublished internal papers.
Stratton, Lisa, Leslie Hudson, Nova Suenaga, and Barrie Morgan. 1998. Overview of Hawaiian dry forest propagation techniques. Newsletter of the Hawaiian Botanical Society 37 (2):13, 15-27.
Wagner, Warren L., Darrel R. Herbst, and S. H. Sohmer. 1990. Manual of the flowering plants of Hawai’i. 2 vols., Bishop Museum Special Publication 83. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press and Bishop Museum Press. p. 1280
Antidiarrhoeal activity of Waltheria americana, Commelina coelestis and Alternanthera repens.
Zavala MA, Perez S, Perez C, Vargas R, Perez RM.
Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, Mexico DF, Mexico

The above presentation is for informational and educational purposes only.
It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage.
For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over – the – counter medication is also available.
Consult your doctor, practitioner, and / or pharmacist for any health problem and before using dietary supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications.

**** www.tropilab.com/sleepy-waltheria.html
Synonyms
Waltheria indica, Waltheria elliptica.
Common name
Sleepy morning, uhaloa, hierba de soldado, guasimilla, uha-loa, velvet leaf, malvavisco, marsh-mallow, buff coat, leather coat, monkey bush, basora prieta, escobillo blanco, malvavisco, chamorro.
Family
Sterculiaceae (Cacao family).

Overview
Uhaloa is a common tropical weed in the savannas of Suriname. It grows up to 6 feet tall and the plant mostly branches near the ground.
The whole plant is tomentose hairy while the serrate alternate leaves are bright green; underneath gray.
These leaves have conspicuous veins.
The fragrant flowers, growing in dense clusters in leaf axils, are yellow.
The small seed capsules hold one shiny black seed each.

Medicinal applications
In Polynesia the root bark (cortex) is chewed upon for sore throat, while in Hawaii it is used internally for arthritis, neuralgia and chronic cases of asthma.
An infusion of stem and leaves is also used.
Used against the common cold, diarrhea, unwanted pregnancy, painful menstruation and fatigue.

Pharmacology
There is a possible presence of tannins; the plant is antibacterial and vericidal.
The leaves and buds are smoked to get a legal high.

Visit our CHOLESTEROL -, DIABETES – , HYPERTENSION – and TINCTURE pages.

Hardiness
USDA zone 9 B – 11.
Propagation
Seeds.
Culture
Full sun, grows well on poor soils; can withstand draught.
Plant in frost free spots or after the danger of frost has past.

**** www.stuartxchange.org/Barulad.html

Botany
Barulad is an erect, more or less branched, hairy, shrubby or half woody plant, 0.5 to 1.5 meters high. Leaves are oblong-ovate or oblong, 3.5 to 9 cm long, rounded or blunt at the tip, slightly heart-shaped at the base, with toothed margins. Flowers are yellow, sweet-scented, about 5 mm long, borne on dense, shortly peduncled fascicles at the axils of the leaves.

Distribution
A common weed, in dry places in the settled areas, at low and medium altitudes.

Constituents
Yields mucilage, tannin and sugar.

Properties
Plant considered astringent.
Considered febrifuge and antisyphilitic.
Root considered purgative.

Parts used
Parts used.

Uses
Folkloric
Used for fever and syphilis.
Decoction used as remedy for eruptions of the skin and for washing wounds.
Decoction given to infants, to drink or inhale, at teething.
In Togo and Yoruba, infusion is given as drink and wash, to strengthen a child’s resistance against fevers.
Among the Hausas. used as purgative; decoction used as syphilis prevention or immunity.
Used by farmers as a restorative drink for the labors of harvesting.
In Togo, spoonful of the pulverized plant in hot water, taken morning and evening as cough medicine.
In the Gold Coast, used as abortifacient.
In South Africa, root used as remedy for sterility and as astringent for internal hemorrhages.
In the Antilles, used as emollient.
In West Africa, decoction of roots and leaves, used for washing wounds. In the Ivory Coast, decoction of roots also used as aphrodisiac.
In Nigeria, decoction of roots or chewing of fresh roots used for internal hemorrhage.
Others
Cosmetics: Extract has reported use in several cosmetic products – moisturizers, skin lightening, anti-aging.

Studies
• Anti-Inflammatory / Flavonoids: Study isolated three flavonoids from the whole plant of Waltheria indica. The flavonoids showed significant dose-dependent inhibition of the production of inflammatory mediator NO, cytokines (TNF-a) and interleukin (IL-12) in activated macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity. Findings support the use of W indica for inflammatory diseases.
• Anti-Pneumococcal: Study of 221 crude extracts from 17 species showed 7 from 6 plants, including Waltheria indica, to have promising in vitro bactericidal activity against Pneumococcus, including penicillin-resistant strains. Results suppport its traditional use in the treatment of pneumococcal infections.
• Anti-Plasmodial: In a study of 13 extracts from 8 different species, five species, including W indica (roots and aerial parts) demonstrated moderate antiplasmodial activity.
Availability
Wild-crafted.
Tinctures and extracts in the cybermarket.

Sleepy Morning. Marsh Mallow, Waltheria americana ….Hoàn Tiên ( Hoàng Tiền ), Xà Bà ….#7

Sleepy Morning. Marsh Mallow, Waltheria americana ….Hoàn Tiên ( Hoàng Tiền ), Xà Bà ….#7
Natural Health Tips
Image by Vietnam Plants & America plants
Vietnamese named : Hoàn Tiên ( Hoàng Tiền ), Xà Bà
Common names : Sleepy Morning, Marsh Mallow, Buf Coat, Velvet leaf, Basona Prieta Leather coat, Monkey bush , Uhaloa
Scientist name : Waltheria americana L.
Synonyms : Waltheria indica Linn, Waltheria elliptica
Family : Sterculiaceae . Họ Trôm

Links :

**** yhoccotruyen.vn/index.php?option=com_content&view=art…

Xà bà, Hoàn tiên – Waltheria americana L. (W.indica L.), thuộc họ Trôm – Sterculiaceae.

Mô tả: Cây thảo hay cây bụi thấp, chỉ cao 35-150cm. Lá có phiến xoan, dài 2-4,2cm, rộng 1,2-2,2cm, màu lục tươi, có lông hình sao như nhung màu trắng; cuống mảnh có lông, lá kèm hình sợi. Cụm hoa xim có hình cầu ở nách lá. Hoa nhiều, nhỏ, màu vàng; đài có lông dày; cánh hoa dài 4-5mm, nhị 5 dính thành bẹ nhẵn; bầu thụt vào trong, vòi có lông hình sao; đầu nhụy thành bó có 25 cành. Quả rất nhỏ, hình chùy; hạt đơn độc màu đen, có lông.

Ra hoa kết quả tháng 11 đến tháng 6.

Bộ phận dùng: Rễ, thân – Radix et Caulis Waltheriae Americanae.

Nơi sống và thu hái: Loài của toàn thế giới nhiệt đới. Thường gặp phổ biến trên đất hoang, dọc đường đi vùng đồng bằng khắp nước ta.

Tính vị, tác dụng: Vị cay, hơi ngọt, tính bình; có tác dụng khư thấp, khu phong, tiêu viêm, giải độc.

Công dụng, chỉ định và phối hợp: Ở Vân Nam (Trung Quốc) dùng làm thuốc hạ tiêu, bạch đới, mụn nhọt ghẻ lở và viêm tuyến vú.

Ở Malaixia , cây được xem như là làm dịu và long đờm, được dùng chữa ho.

Ở Philippin, cây dùng làm thuốc hạ sốt và trị giang mai.

Ở Nam Phi, phụ nữ dùng nước sắc rễ uống chữa vô sinh, cơ thể gầy yếu.

(Theo lrc-hueuni.edu.vn)

**** www.thaythuoccuaban.com/vithuoc/xaba.htm

_________________________________________________________

**** www.tropilab.com/waltheriatincture.html
Overview

A tropical shrub, the whole plant (roots, leaves, buds and flowers) is used against chronic asthma.
This plant has anti inflammatory and antifungal properties.
Other uses include: cortex (root bark); chewed as a very effective natural medicine for sore throat.
Internally for arthritis, neuralgia, common cold, cough, bronchial phlegm or mucous, diarrhea, eye baths, fatigue; used as a bitter tonic.
Waltheria is used in Brazil against bronchitis and for cleaning difficult healing wounds.
Used in the Caribbean for bladder infections.
This is one of the best plant medicines for sore throats and a good herb for bronchial or bacterial infections.

Phytochemicals

Mucilage, tannin, peptide alkaloids, adouetin X,Y,Y1, and Z, Quercetin.

Pharmacology

In a study of several extracts from different species, five species, including Waltheria (roots and aerial parts) demonstrated moderate antiplasmodial activity.
Study of crude extracts from 17 species showed Waltheria to have promising in vitro bactericidal activity against Pneumococcus, including penicillin-resistant strains.
In a study three flavonoids were from the whole plant of Waltheria. The flavonoids showed significant dose-dependent inhibition of the production of inflammatory mediator NO, cytokines (TNF-a) and interleukin (IL-12) in activated macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity. The findings support the use of this plant for inflammatory diseases.
Quercetin is a ubiquitous bioflavonoid* with powerful activity against the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophages stimulated by lipo-polysaccharide.
A mixture of bioflavonoids from Waltheria americana a plant used for centuries in India for inflammatory disorders, was found to significantly and dose-dependently inhibit the production of the nitric oxide (NO) and the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-a and interleukin (IL)-12, in lipopolysaccharide and g interferon activated murine peritoneal macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity (cytotoxicity means being toxic to cells).
The major constituent of extracts of this was quercetin.
The flavenoid constituents 5,2?, 5?- trihydroxy-3,7,4?-trimethoxyflavone and 5,2,?-dihydroxy-3,7,4?,5?- tetramethoxyflavone show strong antifungal activity.

*Bioflavonoids are a large, heterogeneous group of pigmented plant molecules; they may have emerged because of their ability to cope with the immense free radical load associated with photosynthesis.
They are polyphenols, but beyond that they have a wide structural diversity.
Over 4000 bioflavonoids have so far been described.

Dosage

Infusion: 1 – 2 cups daily
Tincture: 1 – 2 ml. daily (1 – 2 full droppers)

Interaction / side effects

There are no interactions and/or side-effects known.

Reference

National Tropical Botanical Garden (NTBG). n.d. ‘Uhaloa. In Native Hawaiian plant information sheets. Lawai, Kauai: Hawaii Plant Conservation Center. National Tropical Botanical Garden. Unpublished internal papers.
Stratton, Lisa, Leslie Hudson, Nova Suenaga, and Barrie Morgan. 1998. Overview of Hawaiian dry forest propagation techniques. Newsletter of the Hawaiian Botanical Society 37 (2):13, 15-27.
Wagner, Warren L., Darrel R. Herbst, and S. H. Sohmer. 1990. Manual of the flowering plants of Hawai’i. 2 vols., Bishop Museum Special Publication 83. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press and Bishop Museum Press. p. 1280
Antidiarrhoeal activity of Waltheria americana, Commelina coelestis and Alternanthera repens.
Zavala MA, Perez S, Perez C, Vargas R, Perez RM.
Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, Mexico DF, Mexico

The above presentation is for informational and educational purposes only.
It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage.
For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over – the – counter medication is also available.
Consult your doctor, practitioner, and / or pharmacist for any health problem and before using dietary supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications.

**** www.tropilab.com/sleepy-waltheria.html
Synonyms
Waltheria indica, Waltheria elliptica.
Common name
Sleepy morning, uhaloa, hierba de soldado, guasimilla, uha-loa, velvet leaf, malvavisco, marsh-mallow, buff coat, leather coat, monkey bush, basora prieta, escobillo blanco, malvavisco, chamorro.
Family
Sterculiaceae (Cacao family).

Overview
Uhaloa is a common tropical weed in the savannas of Suriname. It grows up to 6 feet tall and the plant mostly branches near the ground.
The whole plant is tomentose hairy while the serrate alternate leaves are bright green; underneath gray.
These leaves have conspicuous veins.
The fragrant flowers, growing in dense clusters in leaf axils, are yellow.
The small seed capsules hold one shiny black seed each.

Medicinal applications
In Polynesia the root bark (cortex) is chewed upon for sore throat, while in Hawaii it is used internally for arthritis, neuralgia and chronic cases of asthma.
An infusion of stem and leaves is also used.
Used against the common cold, diarrhea, unwanted pregnancy, painful menstruation and fatigue.

Pharmacology
There is a possible presence of tannins; the plant is antibacterial and vericidal.
The leaves and buds are smoked to get a legal high.

Visit our CHOLESTEROL -, DIABETES – , HYPERTENSION – and TINCTURE pages.

Hardiness
USDA zone 9 B – 11.
Propagation
Seeds.
Culture
Full sun, grows well on poor soils; can withstand draught.
Plant in frost free spots or after the danger of frost has past.

**** www.stuartxchange.org/Barulad.html

Botany
Barulad is an erect, more or less branched, hairy, shrubby or half woody plant, 0.5 to 1.5 meters high. Leaves are oblong-ovate or oblong, 3.5 to 9 cm long, rounded or blunt at the tip, slightly heart-shaped at the base, with toothed margins. Flowers are yellow, sweet-scented, about 5 mm long, borne on dense, shortly peduncled fascicles at the axils of the leaves.

Distribution
A common weed, in dry places in the settled areas, at low and medium altitudes.

Constituents
Yields mucilage, tannin and sugar.

Properties
Plant considered astringent.
Considered febrifuge and antisyphilitic.
Root considered purgative.

Parts used
Parts used.

Uses
Folkloric
Used for fever and syphilis.
Decoction used as remedy for eruptions of the skin and for washing wounds.
Decoction given to infants, to drink or inhale, at teething.
In Togo and Yoruba, infusion is given as drink and wash, to strengthen a child’s resistance against fevers.
Among the Hausas. used as purgative; decoction used as syphilis prevention or immunity.
Used by farmers as a restorative drink for the labors of harvesting.
In Togo, spoonful of the pulverized plant in hot water, taken morning and evening as cough medicine.
In the Gold Coast, used as abortifacient.
In South Africa, root used as remedy for sterility and as astringent for internal hemorrhages.
In the Antilles, used as emollient.
In West Africa, decoction of roots and leaves, used for washing wounds. In the Ivory Coast, decoction of roots also used as aphrodisiac.
In Nigeria, decoction of roots or chewing of fresh roots used for internal hemorrhage.
Others
Cosmetics: Extract has reported use in several cosmetic products – moisturizers, skin lightening, anti-aging.

Studies
• Anti-Inflammatory / Flavonoids: Study isolated three flavonoids from the whole plant of Waltheria indica. The flavonoids showed significant dose-dependent inhibition of the production of inflammatory mediator NO, cytokines (TNF-a) and interleukin (IL-12) in activated macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity. Findings support the use of W indica for inflammatory diseases.
• Anti-Pneumococcal: Study of 221 crude extracts from 17 species showed 7 from 6 plants, including Waltheria indica, to have promising in vitro bactericidal activity against Pneumococcus, including penicillin-resistant strains. Results suppport its traditional use in the treatment of pneumococcal infections.
• Anti-Plasmodial: In a study of 13 extracts from 8 different species, five species, including W indica (roots and aerial parts) demonstrated moderate antiplasmodial activity.
Availability
Wild-crafted.
Tinctures and extracts in the cybermarket.

Plum Kids Organic Morning Mashups, Maple Banana, 4-Count

Plum Kids Organic Morning Mashups, Maple Banana, 4-Count

  • A puree of real organic fruit, whole grain oats, and ancient grain quinoa
  • Certified organic, Non-GMO ingredients
  • No added sugar & free of high fructose corn syrup, trans fats and artificial ingredients
  • Great for the lunchbox and on-the-go snacking
  • Convenient, portable & resealable pouch; 100% BPA-free packaging

At Plum Organics, we believe that all children deserve access to healthy, wholesome foods. We want kids to grow, learn, and play… and one day change the world. Plum kids know that what’s good for you should taste good too. Our organic packable snacks make it easy to nourish your kids with yummy, balanced nutrition. From lunchtime to on-the-go kids never stop, and neither does Plum. So grab a snack from our whole line of fruits, grains, yogurts, and yes even veggies! We’ll be there anytime with real organic foods to inspire a joy of eating and energy for exploration. An organic, whole-grain way to squeeze the day our Plum Kids Morning Mashups are a quick, easy, delicious and healthy breakfast for kids on the go. Ahoy breakfast-skippers! Morning Mashups are a hearty blend of whole grain oats and quinoa. We’ve swirled them up with the natural sweetness of real fruit to create a rich & creamy meal for morning time or anytime. No spoon needed just easy-squeezy fun so you can sail through the day! Our innovative shelf stable pouch retains freshness, flavor and nutrients of purees and offers easy feeding with a convenient, portable and resealable no mess solution for kids. Our products are certified organic, nutrient rich, free of high fructose corn syrup, trans fats, and artificial ingredients. Organic Morning Mashups from Plum Organics a fun, healthy breakfast for kids on the go!

List Price: $ 4.99

Price: $ 4.99