MTV Makes Brooke Dragon Into A Bikini Model – Bodybuilding.com

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Transfer Pipettes – Fine Tip, 1.5mL Capacity – Model 134020 – Box of 400

Transfer Pipettes – Fine Tip, 1.5mL Capacity – Model 134020 – Box of 400

  • This is for the ‘Fine Tip’ ONLY! It may differ from the image shown in size, color, shape, etc.
  • It may also be a replacement part for the ‘Transfer Pipettes.’ Please refer to the manufacturer and model number given along with the packaging information.
  • Transfer Pipettes – Fine Tip, 1.5mL Capacity – Model 134020 – Box of 400
  • Manufacturer: Generic Products. Model Number: 134020
  • Size: 1.5mL Capacity. Sold by: Box of 400. Categorization: Equipment >> Lab Supplies

Transfer Pipettes are made from low density polyethylene. Non-sterile.

List Price: $ 24.55

Price: $ 24.55

Jaguar E-Type 4.2 at Samuel’s in Allston: Model plate on the trunk / boot lid

Jaguar E-Type 4.2 at Samuel’s in Allston: Model plate on the trunk / boot lid
Good Health Tips
Image by Chris Devers
Quoting from Wikipedia: Jaguar E-Type:

• • • • •

The Jaguar E-Type (UK) or XK-E (US) is a British automobile manufactured by Jaguar between 1961 and 1974. Its combination of good looks, high performance, and competitive pricing established the marque as an icon of 1960s motoring. A great success for Jaguar, over seventy thousand E-Types were sold during its lifespan.

In March 2008, the Jaguar E-Type ranked first in Daily Telegraph list of the "100 most beautiful cars" of all time.[2] In 2004, Sports Car International magazine placed the E-Type at number one on their list of Top Sports Cars of the 1960s.

Contents

1 Overview
2 Concept versions
•• 2.1 E1A (1957)
•• 2.2 E2A (1960)
3 Production versions
•• 3.1 Series 1 (1961-1968)
•• 3.2 Series 2 (1969-1971)
•• 3.3 Series 3 (1971-1975)
4 Limited edtions
•• 4.1 Low Drag Coupé (1962)
•• 4.2 Lightweight E-Type (1963-1964)
5 Motor Sport
6 See also
7 References
8 External links

Overview

The E-Type was initially designed and shown to the public as a grand tourer in two-seater coupé form (FHC or Fixed Head Coupé) and as convertible (OTS or Open Two Seater). The 2+2 version with a lengthened wheelbase was released several years later.

On its release Enzo Ferrari called it "The most beautiful car ever made".

The model was made in three distinct versions which are now generally referred to as "Series 1", "Series 2" and "Series 3". A transitional series between Series 1 and Series 2 is known unofficially as "Series 1½".

In addition, several limited-edition variants were produced:

• The "’Lightweight’ E-Type" which was apparently intended as a sort of follow-up to the D-Type. Jaguar planned to produce 18 units but ultimately only a dozen were reportedly built. Of those, one is known to have been destroyed and two others have been converted to coupé form. These are exceedingly rare and sought after by collectors.
• The "Low Drag Coupé" was a one-off technical exercise which was ultimately sold to a Jaguar racing driver. It is presently believed to be part of the private collection of the current Viscount Cowdray.

Concept versions

E1A (1957)

After their success at LeMans 24 hr through the 1950s Jaguars defunct racing department were given the brief to use D-Type style construction to build a road going sports car, replacing the XK150.

It is suspected that the first prototype (E1A) was given the code based on: (E): The proposed production name E-Type (1): First Prototype (A): Aluminium construction (Production models used steel bodies)

The car featured a monocoque design, Jaguar’s fully independent rear suspension and the well proved "XK" engine.

The car was used solely for factory testings and was never formally released to the public. The car was eventually scrapped by the factory

E2A (1960)

Jaguar’s second E-Type concept was E2A which unlike E1A was constructed from a steel chassis and used a aluminium body. This car was completed as a race car as it was thought by Jaguar at the time it would provide a better testing ground.

E2A used a 3 litre version of the XK engine with a Lucas fuel injection system.

After retiring from the LeMans 24 hr the car was shipped to America to be used for racing by Jaguar privateer Briggs Cunningham.

In 1961 the car returned to Jaguar in England to be used as a testing mule.

Ownership of E2A passed to Roger Woodley (Jaguars customer competition car manager) who took possession on the basis the car not be used for racing. E2A had been scheduled to be scrapped.

Roger’s wife Penny Griffiths owned E2A until 2008 when it was offered for sale at Bonham’s Quail Auction. Sale price was US.5 million

Production versions

Series 1 (1961-1968)

Series I

• Production
1961–1968[3] [4]

Body style(s)
2-door coupe
2-door 2+2 coupe
2-door convertible

Engine(s)
3.8 L XK I6
4.2 L XK I6

Wheelbase
96.0 in (2438 mm) (FHC / OTS)
105.0 in (2667 mm) (2+2) [5]

• Length
175.3125 in (4453 mm) (FHC / OTS)
184.4375 in (4685 mm) (2+2) [5]

• Width
65.25 in (1657 mm) (all) [5]

• Height
48.125 in (1222 mm) (FHC)
50.125 in (1273 mm) (2+2)
46.5 in (1181 mm) (OTS)[5]

Curb weight
2,900 lb (1,315 kg) (FHC)
2,770 lb (1,256 kg) (OTS)
3,090 lb (1,402 kg) (2+2) [6]

• Fuel capacity
63.64 L (16.8 US gal; 14.0 imp gal)[5]

The Series 1 was introduced, initially for export only, in March 1961. The domestic market launch came four months later in July 1961.[7] The cars at this time used the triple SU carburetted 3.8 litre 6-cylinder Jaguar XK6 engine from the XK150S. The first 500 cars built had flat floors and external hood (bonnet) latches. These cars are rare and more valuable. After that, the floors were dished to provide more leg room and the twin hood latches moved to inside the car. The 3.8 litre engine was increased to 4.2 litres in October 1964.[7]

All E-Types featured independent coil spring rear suspension with torsion bar front ends, and four wheel disc brakes, in-board at the rear, all were power-assisted. Jaguar was one of the first auto manufacturers to equip cars with disc brakes as standard from the XK150 in 1958. The Series 1 can be recognised by glass covered headlights (up to 1967), small "mouth" opening at the front, signal lights and tail-lights above bumpers and exhaust tips under the licence plate in the rear.

3.8 litre cars have leather-upholstered bucket seats, an aluminium-trimmed centre instrument panel and console (changed to vinyl and leather in 1963), and a Moss 4-speed gearbox that lacks synchromesh for 1st gear ("Moss box"). 4.2 litre cars have more comfortable seats, improved brakes and electrical systems, and an all-synchromesh 4-speed gearbox. 4.2 litre cars also have a badge on the boot proclaiming "Jaguar 4.2 Litre E-Type" (3.8 cars have a simple "Jaguar" badge). Optional extras included chrome spoked wheels and a detachable hard top for the OTS.

An original E-Type hard top is very rare, and finding one intact with all the chrome, not to mention original paint in decent condition, is rather difficult. For those who want a hardtop and aren’t fussy over whether or not it is an original from Jaguar, several third parties have recreated the hardtop to almost exact specifications. The cost ranges anywhere from double to triple the cost of a canvas/vinyl soft top.

A 2+2 version of the coupé was added in 1966. The 2+2 offered the option of an automatic transmission. The body is 9 in (229 mm) longer and the roof angles are different with a more vertical windscreen. The roadster remained a strict two-seater.

There was a transitional series of cars built in 1967-68, unofficially called "Series 1½", which are externally similar to Series 1 cars. Due to American pressure the new features were open headlights, different switches, and some de-tuning (with a downgrade of twin Zenith-Stromberg carbs from the original triple SU carbs) for US models. Some Series 1½ cars also have twin cooling fans and adjustable seat backs. Series 2 features were gradually introduced into the Series 1, creating the unofficial Series 1½ cars, but always with the Series 1 body style.

Less widely known, there was also right at the end of Series 1 production and prior to the transitional "Series 1½" referred to above, a very small number of Series 1 cars produced with open headlights.[8] These are sometimes referred to as "Series 1¼" cars.[9] Production dates on these machines vary but in right hand drive form production has been verified as late as March 1968.[10] It is thought that the low number of these cars produced relative to the other Series make them amongst the rarest of all production E Types.

An open 3.8 litre car, actually the first such production car to be completed, was tested by the British magazine The Motor in 1961 and had a top speed of 149.1 mph (240.0 km/h) and could accelerate from 0-60 mph (97 km/h) in 7.1 seconds. A fuel consumption of 21.3 miles per imperial gallon (13.3 L/100 km; 17.7 mpg-US) was recorded. The test car cost £2097 including taxes.[11]

Production numbers from Graham[12]:

• 15,490 3.8s
• 17,320 4.2s
• 10,930 2+2s

Production numbers from xkedata.com[13]: [omitted — Flickr doesn’t allow tables]

Series 2 (1969-1971)

Series II

• Production
1969–1971[3] [4]

Body style(s)
2-door coupe
2-door 2+2 coupe
2-door convertible

Engine(s)
4.2 L XK I6

Curb weight
3,018 lb (1,369 kg) (FHC)
2,750 lb (1,247 kg) (OTS)
3,090 lb (1,402 kg) (2+2) [6]

Open headlights without glass covers, a wrap-around rear bumper, re-positioned and larger front indicators and taillights below the bumpers, better cooling aided by an enlarged "mouth" and twin electric fans, and uprated brakes are hallmarks of Series 2 cars. De-tuned in US, but still with triple SUs in the UK, the engine is easily identified visually by the change from smooth polished cam covers to a more industrial ‘ribbed’ appearance. Late Series 1½ cars also had ribbed cam covers. The interior and dashboard were also redesigned, with rocker switches that met U.S health and safety regulations being substituted for toggle switches. The dashboard switches also lost their symmetrical layout. New seats were fitted, which purists claim lacked the style of the originals but were certainly more comfortable. Air conditioning and power steering were available as factory options.

Production according to Graham[12] is 13,490 of all types.

Series 2 production numbers from xkedata.com[13]: [omitted — Flickr doesn’t allow tables]

Official delivery numbers by market and year are listed in Porter[3] but no summary totals are given.

Series 3 (1971-1975)

Series III

• Production
1971–1975

Body style(s)
2-door 2+2 coupe
2-door convertible

Engine(s)
5.3 L Jaguar V12

Wheelbase
105 in (2667 mm) (both)[6]

• Length
184.4 in (4684 mm) (2+2)
184.5 in (4686 mm) (OTS)[6]

• Width
66.0 in (1676 mm) (2+2)
66.1 in (1679 mm) (OTS)[6]

• Height
48.9 in (1242 mm) (2+2)
48.1 in (1222 mm) (OTS)[6]

Curb weight
3,361 lb (1,525 kg) (2+2)
3,380 lb (1,533 kg) (OTS)[6]

• Fuel capacity
82 L (21.7 US gal; 18.0 imp gal)[14]

A new 5.3 L 12-cylinder Jaguar V12 engine was introduced, with uprated brakes and standard power steering. The short wheelbase FHC body style was discontinued and the V12 was available only as a convertible and 2+2 coupé. The convertible used the longer-wheelbase 2+2 floorplan. It is easily identifiable by the large cross-slatted front grille, flared wheel arches and a badge on the rear that proclaims it to be a V12. There were also a very limited number of 4.2 litre six-cylinder Series 3 E-Types built. These were featured in the initial sales literature. It is believed these are the rarest of all E-Types of any remaining.

In 2008 a British classic car enthusiast assembled what is surely the last ever E-Type from parts bought from the end-of-production surplus in 1974.[15]

Graham[12] lists production at 15,290.

Series 3 production numbers from xkedata.com[13]: [omitted — Flickr doesn’t allow tables]

Limited edtions

Two limited production E-Type variants were made as test beds, the Low Drag Coupe and Lightweight E-Type, both of which were raced:

Low Drag Coupé (1962)

Shortly after the introduction of the E-Type, Jaguar management wanted to investigate the possibility of building a car more in the spirit of the D-Type racer from which elements of the E-Type’s styling and design were derived. One car was built to test the concept designed as a coupé as its monocoque design could only be made rigid enough for racing by using the "stressed skin" principle. Previous Jaguar racers were built as open-top cars because they were based on ladder frame designs with independent chassis and bodies. Unlike the steel production E-Types the LDC used lightweight aluminium. Sayer retained the original tub with lighter outer panels riveted and glued to it. The front steel sub frame remained intact, the windshield was given a more pronounced slope and the rear hatch welded shut. Rear brake cooling ducts appeared next to the rear windows,and the interior trim was discarded, with only insulation around the transmission tunnel. With the exception of the windscreen, all cockpit glass was plexi. A tuned version of Jaguar’s 3.8 litre engine with a wide angle cylinder-head design tested on the D-Type racers was used. Air management became a major problem and, although much sexier looking and certainly faster than a production E-Type, the car was never competitive: the faster it went, the more it wanted to do what its design dictated: take off.

The one and only test bed car was completed in summer of 1962 but was sold a year later to Jaguar racing driver Dick Protheroe who raced it extensively and eventually sold it. Since then it has passed through the hands of several collectors on both sides of the Atlantic and now is believed to reside in the private collection of the current Viscount Cowdray.

Lightweight E-Type (1963-1964)

In some ways, this was an evolution of the Low Drag Coupé. It made extensive use of aluminium alloy in the body panels and other components. However, with at least one exception, it remained an open-top car in the spirit of the D-Type to which this car is a more direct successor than the production E-Type which is more of a GT than a sports car. The cars used a tuned version of the production 3.8 litre Jaguar engine with 300 bhp (224 kW) output rather than the 265 bhp (198 kW) produced by the "ordinary" version. At least one car is known to have been fitted with fuel-injection.

The cars were entered in various races but, unlike the C-Type and D-Type racing cars, they did not win at Le Mans or Sebring.

Motor Sport

Bob Jane won the 1963 Australian GT Championship at the wheel of an E-Type.

The Jaguar E-Type was very successful in SCCA Production sports car racing with Group44 and Bob Tullius taking the B-Production championship with a Series-3 V12 racer in 1975. A few years later, Gran-Turismo Jaguar from Cleveland Ohio campaigned a 4.2 L 6 cylinder FHC racer in SCCA production series and in 1980, won the National Championship in the SCCA C-Production Class defeating a fully funded factory Nissan Z-car team with Paul Newman.

See also

Jaguar XK150 – predecessor to the E-Type
Jaguar XJS – successor to the E-Type
Jaguar XK8 – The E-Type’s current and spiritual successor
Guyson E12 – a rebodied series III built by William Towns

References

^ Loughborough graduate and designer of E Type Jaguar honoured
^ 100 most beautiful cars
• ^ a b cPorter, Philip (2006). Jaguar E-type, the definitive history. p. 443. ISBN 0-85429-580-1.
• ^ a b"’69 Series 2 Jaguar E Types", Autocar, October 24, 1968
• ^ a b c d eThe Complete Official Jaguar "E". Cambridge: Robert Bentley. 1974. p. 12. ISBN 0-8376-0136-3.
• ^ a b c d e f g"Jaguar E-Type Specifications". http://www.web-cars.com/e-type/specifications.php. Retrieved 29 August 2009.
• ^ a b"Buying secondhand E-type Jaguar". Autocar 141 (nbr4042): pages 50–52. 6 April 1974.
^ See Jaguar Clubs of North America concourse information at: [1] and more specifically the actual Series 1½ concourse guide at [2]
^ Ibid.
^ Compare right hand drive VIN numbers given in JCNA concours guide referred to above with production dates for right hand drive cars as reflected in the XKEdata database at [3]
^"The Jaguar E-type". The Motor. March 22, 1961.
• ^ a b cRobson, Graham (2006). A–Z British Cars 1945–1980. Devon, UK: Herridge & Sons. ISBN 0-9541063-9-3.
• ^ a b chttp://www.xkedata.com/stats/. http://www.xkedata.com/stats/. Retrieved 29 August 2009.
^Daily Express Motor Show Review 1975 Cars: Page 24 (Jaguar E V12). October 1974.
^ jalopnik.com/5101872/british-man-cobbles-together-last-ja…

Apple iPod touch 16 GB (2nd Generation) [Previous Model]

Apple iPod touch 16 GB (2nd Generation) [Previous Model]

  • This player is the iPod touch, not the Apple iPhone; iPhone software is not included with this iPod touch but is available for download at apple.com
  • 16 GB capacity for 3,500 songs, 10,000 photos, or 20 hours of video
  • Up to 36 hours of music playback or 6 hours of video playback when fully charged
  • 3.5-inch widescreen multi-touch display with 480-by-320-pixel resolution
  • Supported audio formats: AAC, Protected AAC, MP3, MP3 VBR, Audible, Apple Lossless, AIFF, and WAV; supported video formats: H.264, MPEG-4; supported image file types: JPEG, BMP, GIF, TIFF, PSD (Mac only), and PNG

The iPod touch has always been an amazing iPod. And with its groundbreaking technologies including a Multi-Touch screen, the accelerometer, and 3D graphics and access to hundreds of games, iPod touch puts an amazing gaming experience in the palm of your hand. It comes in 8 GB, 16 GB, and 32 GB models with new volume controls and a built-in speaker. Play hours of music. Create a Genius Playlist of songs that go great together. Watch a movie. Surf the web. View rich HTML email. Find your location and get directions with Google Maps. Browse YouTube videos. And shop the App Store for games and applications.The iPod touch has always been an amazing iPod. And with its groundbreaking technologies–including a Multi-Touch screen, the accelerometer, and 3D graphics–and access to hundreds of games, iPod touch puts an amazing gaming experience in the palm of your hand. It comes in 8 GB, 16 GB, and 32 GB models with new volume controls and a built-in speaker. Play hours of music. Create a Genius Playlist of songs that go great together. Watch a movie. Surf the web. View rich HTML email. Find your location and get directions with Google Maps. Browse YouTube videos. And shop the App Store for games and applications.

Millions of songs, thousands of videos, hundreds of games. Click to enlarge.

Music
Music on iPod touch not only sounds amazing, it looks amazing, too.

Touch Your Music
Remember what it felt like to flip through your CD or record collection? Cover Flow brings that feeling back. Just turn iPod touch on its side and flick through your music to find the album you want to hear. Tap the cover to flip it over and display a track list. Tap again to start the music. Even view the lyrics while you’re listening.

A Musical Genius
Say you’re listening to a song you really like and want to hear other tracks that go great with it. The new Genius feature finds the songs in your library that go great together and makes a Genius Playlist for you. You can listen to the playlist right away, save it for later, or even refresh it and give it another go. Count on Genius to create a mix you wouldn’t have thought of yourself.

Fill It Up
Fill up your iPod touch with audio and video from your iTunes library. All you have to do is choose the playlists, videos, and other content you want to sync, and iTunes does the rest.

The iPod touch feels even better in your hand, thanks to the stunningly thin, contoured enclosure made of polished stainless steel.

Just turn iPod touch on its side and flick through your music to find the album you want to hear. Click to enlarge.

Carry hours of video with you, and watch it on a crisp, clear 3.5-inch widescreen color display.

Movies and TV Shows
Movies and TV shows have never looked this good on a portable device.

Everything’s a Must-see
Carry hours of video with you, and watch it on a crisp, clear 3.5-inch widescreen color display. Need ideas? From Hollywood blockbusters to independent favorites, there’s something for everyone at the iTunes Store. Download and watch movies with a few clicks. Prefer TV shows? Buy a single episode or an entire season’s worth all at once.

In Control
While watching your video, tap the display to bring up the onscreen controls. You can play/pause, view by chapter, and adjust the volume. You also can use the new volume controls on the left side of iPod touch. Want to switch between widescreen and full screen? Simply tap the display twice.

Sync and Go
Need some entertainment for your next flight or road trip? With iTunes on your Mac or PC, you can sit at your computer and choose the movies and TV shows you want to sync to your iPod touch.

Games
With its groundbreaking technologies, iPod touch puts an amazing gaming experience in the palm of your hand.

Get in the Game
Developers all over the world are creating exciting games unlike anything you’ve ever seen on an iPod or mobile device. Many games come alive with stunning 3D graphics and immerse you in the action with the advanced technologies in iPod touch. There’s even a built-in speaker, so you can hear all the action.

Fingertip Control
Many games for iPod touch use Multi-Touch to give you precise, fingertip control over game elements. Use your finger to drag your pieces around the board in chess or dice games. Or pinch to enlarge or shrink your view, rotate your character left or right, or just tap to make a selection.

Tilt, Turn, and Go
The built-in accelerometer actually responds to your movements, so you can tilt and turn your iPod touch to control the action. It’s perfect for racing games–where your entire iPod touch acts as a steering wheel–and for tap-and-tilt games like Super Monkey Ball, in which your character rolls to your movements.

The App Store
Even if games aren’t your thing, there’s an iPod touch application for you. Thousands of applications in almost every category–entertainment, social networking, sports, photography, reference, and travel–are a tap away at the App Store.

Developers all over the world are creating exciting games unlike anything you’ve ever seen on an iPod or mobile device. Click to enlarge.

The built-in wireless capability in iPod touch gives you access to the iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store, where you can choose from millions of songs with a tap.

iPod touch features Safari, the most advanced web browser ever on a portable device.

iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store
Discover new music anywhere.

Buy on the Fly
The built-in wireless capability in iPod touch gives you access to the iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store, where you can choose from millions of songs with a tap. Browse New Releases, What’s Hot, and Genres. Take a look at Top Songs and Top Albums. Or find exactly what you’re looking for with a quick search. Play a 30-second preview of any song, then tap once to buy it. Your music starts downloading instantly, and you can keep tabs on its progress by tapping the Downloads button.

Sync it Back
When you connect iPod touch to your computer, the music you bought on-the-go syncs to your iTunes library. If you’ve partially downloaded a song to iPod touch, your computer completes the download automatically.

iPod touch at Starbucks
If you have an iPod touch, an iPhone, or a computer with the latest version of iTunes, you get free Wi-Fi access to the iTunes Store and to Starbucks’ Now Playing content. Stroll into a participating Starbucks, and you’re connected automatically.

Home Screen
Get instant access to whatever you need on your iPod touch.

Customize Your Home Screen
Arrange the icons on your Home screen any way you want. Even move them to another Home screen. Create up to nine Home screens for quick access to the games and applications you download from the App Store and to your Safari Web Clips.

Go Home
No matter where you are on iPod touch, you can press the Home button to return to the Home screen. You can go back to what you were doing at any time.

Add Apps, Web Clips, and More
Whenever you download an application from the App Store, a new icon appears on your Home screen. And if you check the same websites every day, just create Web Clips and you can access the sites directly from your Home screen with a single tap. Not happy with how they’re organized? Reorder them any way you want by dragging them around the screen.

Safari
iPod touch features Safari, the most advanced web browser ever on a portable device.

Browse Anywhere
The iPod touch is the only iPod with 802.11b/g wireless access to the web. Whenever you’re connected via Wi-Fi, you can access your favorite websites to read news, check scores, pay bills, and go shopping.

Search and Find
iPod touch syncs your bookmarks from your PC or Mac, so you can access favorite sites quickly. It has Google and Yahoo! search built in, so it’s easy to find what you’re looking for on the web.

Zoom with a View
Get a closer look at any web page by zooming in and out with a tap or a pinch of the Multi-Touch display. View websites in portrait or landscape. Rotate iPod touch 90 degrees and the website rotates, too.

Clip it.
If you check a website frequently–a favorite newspaper, blog, or sports site–why not create a Home screen icon for it? Make Web Clips with Safari, and your favorite sites are always just a tap away.

Email on iPod touch looks and works just like email on your computer.

When you’re connected via Wi-Fi, you can get directions, find local businesses, and check traffic with Maps.

Mail
Email on iPod touch looks and works just like email on your computer.

See it All
iPod touch supports rich HTML email, so images and photos appear alongside text. And you see email attachments in their original formats, not stripped-down versions. Rotate, zoom, and pan in more than a dozen standard file and image formats, including PDF; Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint; and iWork.

Access it All
Access your email from popular providers–including MobileMe, Microsoft Exchange, Yahoo! Mail, Google Gmail, and AOL–and most industry-standard IMAP and POP mail systems.

Send Fast
iPod touch recognizes email addresses in different applications. If you run across an email address on a web page or a map listing, for example, just tap it; iPod touch opens a new message and addresses it for you.

Type Smart
With its built-in dictionary, the intelligent iPod touch keyboard predicts and suggests words as you type, making it fast and easy to write email.

Maps
When you’re connected via Wi-Fi, you can get directions, find local businesses, and check traffic.

Find Yourself
iPod touch finds your location using known Wi-Fi hotspots. It also finds points of interest by keyword: Search for “coffee” and iPod touch shows you every cafe nearby.

Get Directions
Just type in an address and get directions from wherever you are. View a list of turn-by-turn directions, or see a highlighted map route. You also can mark specific locations and find the best route between them.

Enjoy the View
Just like Google Maps on your computer, Maps on iPod touch lets you switch between views of Google map data, satellite images, and a hybrid of both. Multi-Touch makes the difference. Tap to zoom, pan, and change your view on the move.

See Traffic
Maps on iPod touch shows you live traffic information, indicating traffic speed along your route in easy-to-read green, red, and yellow highlights.

Love to watch the latest YouTube videos? iPod touch gives you all the fun of the web’s best videos–pocket-size.

iPod touch uses iTunes to sync photos you have in iPhoto on a Mac or Adobe Photoshop Elements and Adobe Photoshop Album on a PC.

Keep your schedule at your fingertips with iPod touch.

Build your contacts list on your Mac with Address Book or on your PC with Microsoft Outlook, then sync everything to your iPod touch using iTunes.

YouTube
Love to watch the latest YouTube videos? iPod touch gives you all the fun of the web’s best videos–pocket-size.

Share from Anywhere
Email your favorite videos to your favorite people. Tap “Share” on any YouTube video detail page, and iPod touch creates an email with the video link already in it.

Watch What You Want
Explore Featured, Most Viewed, Most Recent, and Top Rated videos. Or search for the video you want with a keyword search. Once you find what you’re looking for, bookmark it to watch later.

Photos
Carry up to 25,000 of your favorite photos everywhere.

Share Photos
Show thousands of photos from the palm of your hand. Flick to scroll through thumbnails. Tap to view full screen. Rotate to see a photo in landscape. Pinch to zoom in or out. Play slideshows, complete with music and transitions. Email a photo to a friend, set it as your wallpaper, or share it in a MobileMe Gallery.

Save Photos
If you receive a great image in an email, save it to your photo library on iPod touch. Once there, it acts just like any other photo. You can set it as your wallpaper, share it on the web, or pass it on.

Sync Photos
iPod touch uses iTunes to sync photos you have in iPhoto on a Mac or Adobe Photoshop Elements and Adobe Photoshop Album on a PC. Just choose which photos or albums to sync to your iPod touch, then you can look at them–and share them–anywhere you go.

Calendar
With iPod touch, it’s easy to make plans and stay on schedule.

Add Events
Keep your schedule at your fingertips with iPod touch. Add events to your calendar. Set a custom alert. Write a note or two. Manage multiple color-coded calendars. And do it all with just a few taps.

Stay in Sync
Connect iPod touch to your computer, and the events that you’ve created on-the-go automatically sync to Microsoft Outlook on a PC or iCal on a Mac. And all the events you’ve added on your computer sync to iPod touch.

Three Ways to View
iPod touch gives you three ways to view your calendars. List view shows you all your appointments in the coming days as a comprehensive list, which you can scroll up and down. Day view displays one day’s worth of appointments visually. And Month view offers an at-a-glance look at an entire month.

Contacts
Put names, email addresses, phone numbers, and more at your fingertips.

Make Contact
Build your contacts list on your Mac with Address Book or on your PC with Microsoft Outlook, then sync everything to your iPod touch using iTunes. You also can add contact information directly to your iPod touch from maps, web pages, and email. Next time you sync, your computer is updated, too.

Search Contacts
If you have a lot of contacts, a quick search shows you a list of matching names. Or you can scroll up and down your entire list to find the right contact. Want to send them an email? Just tap an email address and the Mail application opens automatically.

Organized by Groups
If you keep your contacts organized into groups–such as co-workers, friends, family, and so on–iPod touch will, too. And iPod touch can hold more than just names, email addresses, and phone numbers. You also can track birthdays, websites, nicknames, and notes.

Stocks, Weather, and Notes
Stay on top of it all.

Check Stocks
Stocks on iPod touch shows you performance information for any stock you choose. When you want more details about a stock’s performance, tap the Y! for instant access to Yahoo! Finance.

Get Weather
Check worldwide weather at home or away. Add the cities you want, then flick back and forth to get six-day forecasts for each. Tap the Y! to open a Yahoo! city guide that shows you what’s happening, rain or shine.

Take Notes
Forget the pen and paper. Use Notes on iPod touch to write yourself a quick note and keep important information on hand. There’s even a built-in email function that lets you send notes to yourself or others.

Calculator
iPod touch’s calculator helps you settle the restaurant bill or keep track of your budget.

Calculate Simply
When you tap the Calculator icon, iPod touch shows you a simple application with addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and memory functions. Use it just as you would a pocket calculator.

Calculate Scientifically
Your simple calculator doubles as a sophisticated scientific calculator. Just rotate it to landscape to access dozens of functions for solving complex science and math problems.

iPod touch now includes built-in Nike + iPod support.

Nike + iPod
Get the most out of your workout.

Tune Your Run
iPod touch now includes built-in Nike + iPod support. Just slip the Nike + iPod Sensor (available separately) into your Nike+ shoe and start your run. The sensor communicates wirelessly with your iPod touch, tracking your time, distance, and calories burned. It even gives you voice feedback on your progress.

Tune Your Cardio Workout
This feature also works with new cardio equipment available in many fitness centers. Just look for treadmills, ellipticals, stair steppers, and stationary bikes that are Nike + iPod compatible.

Sync with Nikeplus.com
When you get back to your computer, sync your iPod touch via iTunes and transfer your exercise data to nikeplus.com, where you can track your workouts, set goals, and challenge friends.

Multi-Touch
iPod touch features the same revolutionary interface as iPhone.

Glide, Flick, Pinch
Built to take full advantage of the large 3.5-inch display, the Multi-Touch touchscreen interface lets you control everything using only your fingers. So you can glide through albums with Cover Flow, flick through photos and enlarge them with a pinch, zoom in and out on a section of a web page, and control game elements precisely.

How it Works
The Multi-Touch display layers a protective shield over a capacitive panel that senses your touch using electrical fields. It then transmits that information to the LCD screen below it. iPod touch software enables the flick, tap, and pinch.

Type with the Touchscreen Keyboard
iPod touch features an intelligent touchscreen keyboard perfect for browsing the web in Safari, getting directions on a map, searching for videos on YouTube, finding music on the iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store, or adding new contacts. It analyzes keystrokes to suggest words as you type and correct spelling errors automatically. And because it’s software based, it changes its keys to support typing in multiple languages.

iPod touch locates nearby wireless hotspots, including protected networks.

Accelerometer
iPod touch responds to motion using a built-in accelerometer.

Responds to Movement
iPod touch detects when you rotate it from portrait to landscape, then automatically changes the contents of the display. So you immediately see the entire width of a web page, view a photo in its proper aspect ratio, or control a game using only your movements.

How it Works
The accelerometer inside iPod touch uses three elements: a silicon mass, a set of silicon springs, and an electrical current. The silicon springs measure the position of the silicon mass using the electrical current. Rotating iPod touch causes a fluctuation in the electrical current passing through the silicon springs. The accelerometer registers these fluctuations and tells iPod touch to adjust the display accordingly.

Perfect for Gaming
Accelerometer technology really shines when you play games because it immerses you in the action. It’s perfect for racing games–where your entire iPod touch acts as a steering wheel–and for tap-and-tilt games like Super Monkey Ball, in which your character responds to your every movement.

Wireless
Connect iPod touch to the Internet anywhere there’s a wireless network.

Connect Automatically
iPod touch locates nearby wireless hotspots, including protected networks. If you’ve never used a particular network, it asks you to enter a password the first time, and it remembers the password from then on. So the next time you’re within range, it connects automatically.

Surf’s Up
Now you can send email from a coffee shop. Surf the web at the airport. Shop for games from your couch. Browse, buy, and download music from the iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store at select Starbucks locations or other wireless hotspots in your area.

Read Kindle Books on the iPod touch

Read Kindle books on your iPod touch.

  • No Kindle required.
  • Get the best reading experience available on your iPhone or iPod touch.
  • Access your Kindle books even if you don’t have your Kindle with you.
  • Automatically synchronizes your last page read between devices with Amazon Whispersync.
  • Adjust the text size, add bookmarks, and view the annotations you created on your Kindle.
  • Don’t have a Kindle? Get yours here.

Shop for Books on the Kindle Store on Your iPod touch

  • Buy a book from the Kindle Store, optimized for Safari, on your iPod touch or iPhone and get it auto-delivered wirelessly.
  • Search and browse more than 400,000 books, including more than 103 of 112 New York Times bestsellers.
  • Find New York Times bestsellers and new releases for .99, unless marked otherwise.
  • Get free book samples; read the first chapter for free before you decide to buy.
  • Books you purchase also can be read on a Kindle.
  • Kindle newspapers, magazines, and blogs are not currently available on the iPod touch or iPhone.
  • Kindle for iPhone is currently available for customers in Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Rep., Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, South Korea, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Republic of, Mexico, Moldova, Republic Of, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, and Vietnam



What’s in the Box
iPod touch 16 GB, earphones, USB 2.0 cable, dock adapter, polishing cloth, quick start guide

List Price: $ 359.99

Price: $ 219.99

Female Fitness Model – Flavia Del Monte Photo Shoot! [Teaser]

www.FlaviliciousFitness.com is a women’s #1 spot for a flawless figure and to look like a female fitness model without having to step on stage! Here is a teaser video from my photo shoot I just did on Sunday February 26th at Powerhouse Downtown Tampa gym. The photo shoot was planned for my upcoming product, CURVILICIOUS, which will be released in mid May. My husband, Vince Del Monte, is friends with the owners of Powerhouse International and got word they were looking for a female to shoot a cover for the Powerhouse magazine so my lovely husband volunteered me! So this basically fell right into my lap because of great timing! I had no intentions of being on a cover but I’ll take it! During the next video, I’ll share some cool women fitness tips on how I got my body “fitness model” ready so that you can see what goes into one of these things and learn some of my female fitness tips on how I got ready. May I suggest scheduling a photoshoot for yourself? It is so much fun and you will have those pictures for life. What better reason is there for you to get into shape! Create a calendar for yourself or hubby for an anniversary gift, trust me he will go crazy! When is your deadline and what is for? Is it a wedding, trip, birthday? Let me know below and if you found this motivational, hit me back with a LIKE! Thanks so much for watching and if you want to follow my FULL BODY LICIOUS Workout System that teaches you the style of female workouts I do to get in shape, go here www
Video Rating: 4 / 5

What’s In My Bag! Grocery Bag! Healthy Food, Snacks and Meals, Model Diet

What’s in my bag, my grocery bag! As requested, my healthy foods, snacks and meals that are simple and delicious! Staple foods for my diet to keep thin and healthy and happy! Enjoy! Sheep print T-Shirt: www.urbanog.com Pants: www.urbanog.com Spike Heels: www.urbanog.com UrbanOG Facebook: www.facebook.com Spankie Facebook Page! www.facebook.com Bloopers Video: www.youtube.com Music by: “The Fashion” Spankie Valentine www.spankievalentine.com
Video Rating: 4 / 5