Vegetarian Bodybuilder Andreas Cahling Photo! – Vegan Times Healthy Food Recipes – No Paleo Malnutrition No Crossfit Failure No Meat Cancer Baby Risk

Vegetarian Bodybuilder Andreas Cahling Photo! – Vegan Times Healthy Food Recipes – No Paleo Malnutrition No Crossfit Failure No Meat Cancer Baby Risk
Healthy Foods To Eat
Image by vegetarians-dominate-meat-eaters-01
Vegetarian Protein Muscle Mass – Andreas Cahling Massive Vegetarian Bodybuilder. Body Building Champion.

Meat is a horrible source of protein, it is soaking with a pernicious form of iron called "heme iron" which can damage the human body and especially the liver.

Plants contain a higher quality of iron, which is better absorbed by the human body, and even faster, especially in combination with Vitamin C. Heme Iron, the kind found in meat and steak is horrible for the human male, and can cause damage.

Eating meat is also more effeminate, because unlike plants which contain only the plant form of phytoestrogens which actually PROTECT AGAINST estrogen, meat and hamburgers and steak contain huge amounts of mammalian female hormones, ractopamine, and estradiol.

Each piece of meat a man puts in his mouth is distending his belly, and giving him female hormones which is why so many meat-eaters grow flabby saggy chests and a woman’s paunch-type stomach. This is often seen in BBQ Barbequed meat eaters.

Meat eaters are often obese and with flabby male love-handles. This is due to eating meat. Vegetarians do not have this problem, and have more protein and muscle mass.

Mike Tyson is also a vegan. So is heavyweight UFC Fighter Frank Mir at just shy of 300 pounds of vegetarian muscle. Cal’s football 285 pound strongman linebacker is also vegetarian.

And the biggest bodybuilder in the world at 7 feet 3 inches tall and 435 pounds, is a vegetarian.

A chicken and egg story: tackling malnutrition in DRC

A chicken and egg story: tackling malnutrition in DRC
Healthy Eating Ideas

Image by DFID – UK Department for International Development
Pauline Velo, president of one of the community nutrition ‘cells’ in Masi Manimba, shows off the community’s new chicken coup. Keeping a flock of chickens to lay eggs for the community to eat and sell – rather than just cooking and eating the chickens – is one of the simple ideas that the community has adopted with the help of Action Against Hunger and UK aid.

Pauline Velo is a community volunteer who, with the help of UK aid, was trained in healthy nutrition techniques by Action Against Hunger. She now passes on her training to families in the town of Masi Manimba, in western DR Congo’s Bandundu Province.

Background

Acute malnutrition is a major public health problem across the Democratic Republic of Congo. UK aid has supported the government of DRC and aid agencies including Action Against Hunger to provide emergency nutrition response programmes across DRC in 2010 and 2011.

In some areas, the communities have taken the ideas that Action Against Hunger brought to them, and organised themselves to tackle malnutrition from the ground up – by forming their own co-operative farms and self-support groups.

Read the full story at

Picture: Russell Watkins/Department for International Development

Terms of use

This image is posted under a Creative Commons – Attribution Licence, in accordance with the Open Government Licence. You are free to embed, download or otherwise re-use it, as long as you credit the source as Russell Watkins/Department for International Development’.

The volunteer trainers helping to tackle malnutrition in DR Congo

The volunteer trainers helping to tackle malnutrition in DR Congo
Healthy Eating Ideas

Image by DFID – UK Department for International Development
Anastasie Nakahosa and Pauline Velo, community volunteers who were trained in healthy nutrition techniques by Action Against Hunger in the rural town of Masi Manimba, DRC, with the help of UK aid. They now train families in their communities, educating them how to eat more healthily with the local produce that they grow in community farming projects.

Background

Acute malnutrition is a major public health problem across the Democratic Republic of Congo. UK aid has supported the government of DRC and aid agencies including Action Against Hunger to provide emergency nutrition response programmes across DRC in 2010 and 2011.

In some areas, the communities have taken the ideas that Action Against Hunger brought to them, and organised themselves to tackle malnutrition from the ground up – by forming their own co-operative farms and self-support groups.

Read the full story at

Picture: Russell Watkins/Department for International Development

Terms of use

This image is posted under a Creative Commons – Attribution Licence, in accordance with the Open Government Licence. You are free to embed, download or otherwise re-use it, as long as you credit the source as Russell Watkins/Department for International Development’.

Scientists Without Borders Challenge Offers $10,000 for Solutions to Combat a Critical Consequence of Malnutrition

Scientists Without Borders Challenge Offers ,000 for Solutions to Combat a Critical Consequence of Malnutrition
NEW YORK, Nov. 15, 2010 /PRNewswire/ — Scientists Without Borders, a public/private partnership led by The New York Academy of Sciences, unveiled today an open innovation challenge to address the critical malnutrition problem of folic acid deficiency in women of child-bearing age in the developing world, which contributes to high rates of infant mortality and birth defects. Scientists Without …
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