New Army PT

New Army PT
Fitness Articles
Image by Joint Base Lewis McChord
Courtesy U.S. Army photo

Soldiers at Fort Bliss, Texas, use exercise techniques they learned through the Mission Essential Fitness Program,

Located in the heart of the Pacific Northwest’s Puget Sound region, Joint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM) is the Defense Department’s premiere military installation on the West Coast.
Joint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM) provides world-class installation support to the joint base warfighters, Family members and the surrounding community.
For more information about Joint Base Lewis-McChord, visit the Facebook page at www.facebook.com/JBLMGarrison or read the article at www.nwguardian.com.

Physical Fitness Programs: US Army Basic and Advanced Individual Training (1967)

thefilmarchive.org United States Army Basic Training (also known as Initial Entry Training or IET) is the program of physical and mental training required in order for an individual to become a soldier in the United States Army, United States Army Reserve, or Army National Guard. It is carried out at several different Army posts around the United States. Basic Training is designed to be highly intense and challenging. The challenge comes as much from the difficulty of physical training as it does from the required quick psychological adjustment to an unfamiliar way of life. Basic Training is divided into two parts: Basic Combat Training and Advanced Individual Training. Basic Combat Training (BCT) consists of the first ten weeks of the total Basic Training period, and is identical for all Army, Army Reserve, and Army National Guard recruits. This is where individuals learn about the fundamentals of being a soldier, from combat techniques to the proper way to address a superior. BCT is also where individuals undergo rigorous physical training to prepare their bodies for the eventual physical strain of combat. One of the most difficult and essential lessons learned in BCT is self-discipline, as it introduces prospective soldiers to a strict daily schedule that entails many duties and high expectations for which most civilians are not immediately ready. Advanced Individual Training (AIT) consists of the remainder of the total Basic Training period, and is where recruits

Fitness tips to prepare to join the Army?

Question by : Fitness tips to prepare to join the Army?
I want to join the army, and I would like some fitness tips so I can whip my butt into shape. I’m almost 16 right now, and I’m not really in shape. Any advice from people who have any kind of military experience would be great, or if you just know some tips. Thanks!

Best answer:

Answer by Danny Lupiani
Hey man,

You will need to build mental toughness more than anything, but you will learn that once you join.

you should start out by doing 200-300 push-ups, 200-300 sit-ups, and 50-100 pull-ups everyday. It does not have to be all at once.

You will need to get your general fitness levels up. The best way to do that is by doing this

Jumping jacks-30 seconds
shuffle splits- 30 seconds
mountain climbers- 30 seconds
burpess 30 seconds.

repeat that 3-4 times. Before joining the army you should be doing that for 30 minutes a day.

That should help you get started. If you have anymore questions, please ask.

Good luck.

Danny lupiani

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Army chef provides comfort to Soldiers and Families in central Alaska 110914

Army chef provides comfort to Soldiers and Families in central Alaska 110914
Dinner Recipes For Kids
Image by familymwr
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR

PHOTO CAPTION: View of the new Fort Greely Community Activity Center, Alaska. The menu will include regional favorites such as reindeer sausage and bison burgers, but will also include American favorites such as pizza and Philly Cheesesteak sandwiches. The new center will have food, bowling, arcade and game activities, meeting rooms and Wifi.

Photo by Daniel Cain, Fort Greeley

Army chef provides comfort to Soldiers and Families in central Alaska 110914

By Robert Dozier
IMCOM Public Affairs

Reindeer sausage and bison burgers have only one thing in common. These regional delicacies are featured on the menu for the new Fort Greeley Community Activity Center set to open soon.

“Our menu is extremely family friendly,” said Russell Littel, Chef/Food & Beverage Specialist, Business Operations Directorate. “We offer the ‘lighter fare’ that is in high demand today. There are a variety of healthy salads, and for central Alaska, the soup of the day is essential.”

Fort Greely sits about 320 miles northeast of Anchorage. In July, the average high temperature is 69 degrees. In January, however, the average low is – 11 degrees. At these extremes, comfort is measured in family, fun and good food.

“Healthier options for Soldiers and their Families are the key,” said Littel. “As a father, I can appreciate how important the kids’ menu is.”

There are 84 recipes that Business Operations is managing at the center, where normally a 30-to-40 item menu is common.

“These Soldiers haven’t been to the lower 48 in a while, and pizza, cheesesteak and a good hamburger are a must,” said Littel. “What is uncommon is our “broasted” chicken, which is fried in a pressure cooker.”

Broasted chicken is a method similar to that used by some of the most popular and successful fried chicken retail restaurants.

“This method is quicker to prepare and is a more juicy and crunchy product,” said Littel. “With this recipe and the others, we wanted broad menu choices so that our customers could eat here on a daily basis, maybe two weeks straight, and not have to choose the same menu item.”

The Greely facility has been on the radar for about a year at Business Operations, a department in the G9 Division of the Installation Management Command. They get involved once a need is defined at the Army garrison. In this case, a brand new multi-purpose facility was proposed, including dining, bowling, meetings, arcade and games, requiring the best food that the Army could provide. Business Operations assessed the existing facilities and employee skill sets, lunch and dinner programs, and determined what was best and realistic for the area.

“We don’t just plan the meals,” said Littel, “we design comfort for the men and women serving here.”

Chef Littel also serves as an infantryman and food operations sergeant for the Texas National Guard in the 36th Infantry Division. He will be deploying next year to Afghanistan.
“There are hundreds of Reservists and National Guardsmen who come to Greely to do their mission,” Littel said. “Many have families close by or in town who can really benefit from our planning.”

The Fort Greely Community Activity Center will feature an 8 lane bowling center, billiards, darts, shuffle board and air hockey.

“Think: rec center meets warrior club meets NCO club,” said Daniel Cain, Community Activity Center Manager. “It’ll have a sports bar feel, with a giant chalet-style fireplace at its focal point, but good food is the key.”

The center will have a reading area, an internet capable computer room, a 60-inch television room with theater seating and Wifi, as well.

“This will be the social hub for the Fort Greely Family – Soldiers, , Families, full time National Guard and civilians,” said Cain. “Quality of life-wise, this will be night and day.”

Fort Greely has grown by leaps and bounds in recent years. With growth comes the expectation from the community for facilities that improve the day-to-day experience.

“We are chomping at the bit for the opening,” said Tracy Miley, wife of Col. Joseph L. Miley, commander of the 49th Missile Defense Battalion, “and I love that the menu will have healthy choices for the adults and the children. The community center will become a huge mecca. How amazing is this to have everything right here?”

Army chef provides comfort to Soldiers and Families in central Alaska 110914

Army chef provides comfort to Soldiers and Families in central Alaska 110914
Dinner Recipes For Kids
Image by familymwr
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR

PHOTO CAPTION: Army Chef Russell Littel at home perfecting his technique for the menu preparation of the new Fort Greeley Community Activity Center, Alaska. The menu will include regional favorites such as reindeer sausage and bison burgers, but will also include American favorites such as pizza and Philly Cheesesteak sandwiches.

Photo by permission

Army chef provides comfort to Soldiers and Families in central Alaska 110914

By Robert Dozier
IMCOM Public Affairs

Reindeer sausage and bison burgers have only one thing in common. These regional delicacies are featured on the menu for the new Fort Greeley Community Activity Center set to open soon.

“Our menu is extremely family friendly,” said Russell Littel, Chef/Food & Beverage Specialist, Business Operations Directorate. “We offer the ‘lighter fare’ that is in high demand today. There are a variety of healthy salads, and for central Alaska, the soup of the day is essential.”

Fort Greely sits about 320 miles northeast of Anchorage. In July, the average high temperature is 69 degrees. In January, however, the average low is – 11 degrees. At these extremes, comfort is measured in family, fun and good food.

“Healthier options for Soldiers and their Families are the key,” said Littel. “As a father, I can appreciate how important the kids’ menu is.”

There are 84 recipes that Business Operations is managing at the center, where normally a 30-to-40 item menu is common.

“These Soldiers haven’t been to the lower 48 in a while, and pizza, cheesesteak and a good hamburger are a must,” said Littel. “What is uncommon is our “broasted” chicken, which is fried in a pressure cooker.”

Broasted chicken is a method similar to that used by some of the most popular and successful fried chicken retail restaurants.

“This method is quicker to prepare and is a more juicy and crunchy product,” said Littel. “With this recipe and the others, we wanted broad menu choices so that our customers could eat here on a daily basis, maybe two weeks straight, and not have to choose the same menu item.”

The Greely facility has been on the radar for about a year at Business Operations, a department in the G9 Division of the Installation Management Command. They get involved once a need is defined at the Army garrison. In this case, a brand new multi-purpose facility was proposed, including dining, bowling, meetings, arcade and games, requiring the best food that the Army could provide. Business Operations assessed the existing facilities and employee skill sets, lunch and dinner programs, and determined what was best and realistic for the area.

“We don’t just plan the meals,” said Littel, “we design comfort for the men and women serving here.”

Chef Littel also serves as an infantryman and food operations sergeant for the Texas National Guard in the 36th Infantry Division. He will be deploying next year to Afghanistan.
“There are hundreds of Reservists and National Guardsmen who come to Greely to do their mission,” Littel said. “Many have families close by or in town who can really benefit from our planning.”

The Fort Greely Community Activity Center will feature an 8 lane bowling center, billiards, darts, shuffle board and air hockey.

“Think: rec center meets warrior club meets NCO club,” said Daniel Cain, Community Activity Center Manager. “It’ll have a sports bar feel, with a giant chalet-style fireplace at its focal point, but good food is the key.”

The center will have a reading area, an internet capable computer room, a 60-inch television room with theater seating and Wifi, as well.

“This will be the social hub for the Fort Greely Family – Soldiers, , Families, full time National Guard and civilians,” said Cain. “Quality of life-wise, this will be night and day.”

Fort Greely has grown by leaps and bounds in recent years. With growth comes the expectation from the community for facilities that improve the day-to-day experience.

“We are chomping at the bit for the opening,” said Tracy Miley, wife of Col. Joseph L. Miley, commander of the 49th Missile Defense Battalion, “and I love that the menu will have healthy choices for the adults and the children. The community center will become a huge mecca. How amazing is this to have everything right here?”

Morning Calm Weekly Newspaper – USAG Humphreys – US Army Korea – IMCOM – February 5, 2010

Morning Calm Weekly Newspaper – USAG Humphreys – US Army Korea – IMCOM – February 5, 2010
fitness tips
Image by US Army Korea – IMCOM
imcom.korea.army.mil

Soldiers can improve their two-mile run time and overall fitness by following a few tips from the Health Promotion Coordinator. To learn more, call 753-3253.

Courtesy photo

U.S. Army changes fitness and diet protocols in basic training

U.S. Army changes fitness and diet protocols in basic training
FORT LEONARD WOOD, Mo. — The U.S. Army plans to get new recruits into better shape with a revamped approach to health, fitness and diet at basic training. Gone are the five-mile runs, bayonet drills and fatty foods in the chow line. New recruits will now work on core strength, injury prevention and healthy eating habits.
Read more on KY3 Springfield

Whitney Port: I like convenient meals
Whitney Port treats herself to gummy bears and peanut butter sandwiches when she wants to be naughty.
Read more on Cover Media via Yahoo! Philippines News

How to deal with young picky eaters
MANILA, Philippines – Contrary to popular belief, kids are not born to like hotdogs and skip vegetables. Rather, children’s picky eating habits are made, and the usual suspects are the parents themselves, according to nutritionist Mary Jude Icasiano.
Read more on ABS-CBNNEWS.com

Table Top Exercise – East African partner nations test disaster response during Natural Fire 10 – US Army Africa – 091024

Table Top Exercise – East African partner nations test disaster response during Natural Fire 10 – US Army Africa – 091024
exercise plan
Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

East African partner nations test disaster response during Natural Fire 10

Story by Sgt. Maj. Kimberly Williams
U.S. Army Africa

ENTEBBE, Uganda – Recent natural disasters like the earthquake in Indonesia, the tsunami in Samoa and the H1N1 flu outbreak have brought home to the world that disaster response is a critical function that must be carefully planned, coordinated and conducted. During Exercise Natural Fire 10, representatives from U.S. Africa Command and other international disaster relief agencies brought many of their lessons learned to their East African partner nations in an effort to improve regional disaster response planning.

Key military and civic leaders from Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda came together to take part in an table top exercise (TTX) from Oct. 17-23 simulating a natural disaster taking place in Uganda that requires regional and international support and coordination. U.S. and international facilitators from U.S. Africa Command and the Center for Disaster and Humanitarian Assistance Medicine (CDHAM) developed and designed the exercise.

The scenario used for this TTX was a complex humanitarian disaster resulting from a pandemic flu, said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Carlos Williams, director of Education and Civil-Military Medicine for CDHAM.

Pandemic flus cross all borders and can affect large populations on a national, regional and international basis, said Williams, making this the perfect scenario for a regional partnership training event.

At the heart of the exercise lies U.S. Africa Command’s focus on improving partner nation military capacity in Africa. “The participants are recognizing how their militaries fit into a complex humanitarian disaster response,” said Williams.

“The goal was to bring national and regional participants to the table to discuss how to coordinate with the military during disasters to mitigate loss of life,” he said.
“The military has a wealth of experience in planning and execution,” said Shem Amadi, director and regional advisor of the Regional Disaster Management Center of Excellence located in Nairobi, Kenya. “Given the economic fragility in the region, the military brings a reservoir of manpower and materials that can be deployed quickly until the other systems are put into place.”

During the six day exercise, participants were split into three response teams: the military response team, consisting of Ugandan and partner nations’ military participants; the national response team, consisting of Ugandan representatives from the military, National Task Force for Influenza and civil organizations like World Food Program and the World Health Organizations; and the regional/international cell, consisting of representatives from the other East African countries, and other organizations like the African Union and the Regional Disaster Management Center of Excellence.

The first three days, the participants received background information on pandemic flu, the role of various disaster organizations and the military and the four steps of the disaster cycle: preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation, said Williams.

Then, the participants separated into the three groups and role-played their responses to the simulated pandemic flu outbreak around the world, resulting in the disaster in Uganda. The groups were separated by location in Entebbe and Kampala, and all communication had to be accomplished by phone, computer or meetings, just as in real-life.

As the three groups worked through the scenario, the communication and relationship building grew stronger each day, said Williams. “Our biggest goal is to get people around the table and talk about how to save lives, and it has been amazing,” he said.

“This is a good forum to share our national plans and harmonize our actions,” said Dr. Winyi Kaboyo, assistant commissioner to the Uganda Ministry of Health and secretary to the Uganda National Task Force for Influenza. “We can then move together to combat whatever disaster falls within our region.”

“The crucial point, which was very exciting, was bringing together the military to work with civil authorities,” said Kaboyo. “We have had interactions in the past, during outbreaks like Cholera and Ebola, but they were confined to addressing public health.

“Now, the TTX has expanded cooperation to include all disasters, like floods and earthquakes. We know now who to contact in the Ministry of Defence,” he said. “I hope it will be the same with the other participating countries.”

Amadi agreed. “It was a very fulfilling experience,” he said. “It added value to disaster preparedness and response in this region.”

The partner nations weren’t the only ones learning during the TTX, said Navy Lt. Efrain Rosario, the TTX lead planner from U.S. Africa Command. “We have learned quite a bit from the Ugandans on how to respond to natural disasters. We’re taking a lot back.”

Rosario said that this is the first time that U.S. Africa Command has conducted a TTX on such a large scale, but it won’t be the last. Another TTX is currently being planned for West Africa and could involve up to seven regional partners, he said.

After all the discussions, role playing and evaluations were complete, Williams said the exercise was an unqualified success. “Our goal is to create an opportunity for our partner nations to dialogue on topics that will ultimately save lives,” he said. “That’s the most important thing.”

PHOTO CAPTION: Charles Rutebarika, Ugandan Ministry of Agriculture, asks a question regarding the safety of flu vaccinations during the table top exercise (TTX) in Entebbe and Kampala, Uganda, from Oct. 17-23 that simulates a natural disaster taking place in Uganda. The scenario used for this TTX was a complex humanitarian disaster resulting from a pandemic flu. Key military and civic leaders from Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda took part in the TTX designed to improve regional disaster response planning. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Maj. Kimberly Williams)

Table Top Exercise – East African partner nations test disaster response during Natural Fire 10 – US Army Africa – 091024

Table Top Exercise – East African partner nations test disaster response during Natural Fire 10 – US Army Africa – 091024
exercise plan
Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

East African partner nations test disaster response during Natural Fire 10

Story by Sgt. Maj. Kimberly Williams
U.S. Army Africa

ENTEBBE, Uganda – Recent natural disasters like the earthquake in Indonesia, the tsunami in Samoa and the H1N1 flu outbreak have brought home to the world that disaster response is a critical function that must be carefully planned, coordinated and conducted. During Exercise Natural Fire 10, representatives from U.S. Africa Command and other international disaster relief agencies brought many of their lessons learned to their East African partner nations in an effort to improve regional disaster response planning.

Key military and civic leaders from Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda came together to take part in an table top exercise (TTX) from Oct. 17-23 simulating a natural disaster taking place in Uganda that requires regional and international support and coordination. U.S. and international facilitators from U.S. Africa Command and the Center for Disaster and Humanitarian Assistance Medicine (CDHAM) developed and designed the exercise.

The scenario used for this TTX was a complex humanitarian disaster resulting from a pandemic flu, said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Carlos Williams, director of Education and Civil-Military Medicine for CDHAM.

Pandemic flus cross all borders and can affect large populations on a national, regional and international basis, said Williams, making this the perfect scenario for a regional partnership training event.

At the heart of the exercise lies U.S. Africa Command’s focus on improving partner nation military capacity in Africa. “The participants are recognizing how their militaries fit into a complex humanitarian disaster response,” said Williams.

“The goal was to bring national and regional participants to the table to discuss how to coordinate with the military during disasters to mitigate loss of life,” he said.
“The military has a wealth of experience in planning and execution,” said Shem Amadi, director and regional advisor of the Regional Disaster Management Center of Excellence located in Nairobi, Kenya. “Given the economic fragility in the region, the military brings a reservoir of manpower and materials that can be deployed quickly until the other systems are put into place.”

During the six day exercise, participants were split into three response teams: the military response team, consisting of Ugandan and partner nations’ military participants; the national response team, consisting of Ugandan representatives from the military, National Task Force for Influenza and civil organizations like World Food Program and the World Health Organizations; and the regional/international cell, consisting of representatives from the other East African countries, and other organizations like the African Union and the Regional Disaster Management Center of Excellence.

The first three days, the participants received background information on pandemic flu, the role of various disaster organizations and the military and the four steps of the disaster cycle: preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation, said Williams.

Then, the participants separated into the three groups and role-played their responses to the simulated pandemic flu outbreak around the world, resulting in the disaster in Uganda. The groups were separated by location in Entebbe and Kampala, and all communication had to be accomplished by phone, computer or meetings, just as in real-life.

As the three groups worked through the scenario, the communication and relationship building grew stronger each day, said Williams. “Our biggest goal is to get people around the table and talk about how to save lives, and it has been amazing,” he said.

“This is a good forum to share our national plans and harmonize our actions,” said Dr. Winyi Kaboyo, assistant commissioner to the Uganda Ministry of Health and secretary to the Uganda National Task Force for Influenza. “We can then move together to combat whatever disaster falls within our region.”

“The crucial point, which was very exciting, was bringing together the military to work with civil authorities,” said Kaboyo. “We have had interactions in the past, during outbreaks like Cholera and Ebola, but they were confined to addressing public health.

“Now, the TTX has expanded cooperation to include all disasters, like floods and earthquakes. We know now who to contact in the Ministry of Defence,” he said. “I hope it will be the same with the other participating countries.”

Amadi agreed. “It was a very fulfilling experience,” he said. “It added value to disaster preparedness and response in this region.”

The partner nations weren’t the only ones learning during the TTX, said Navy Lt. Efrain Rosario, the TTX lead planner from U.S. Africa Command. “We have learned quite a bit from the Ugandans on how to respond to natural disasters. We’re taking a lot back.”

Rosario said that this is the first time that U.S. Africa Command has conducted a TTX on such a large scale, but it won’t be the last. Another TTX is currently being planned for West Africa and could involve up to seven regional partners, he said.

After all the discussions, role playing and evaluations were complete, Williams said the exercise was an unqualified success. “Our goal is to create an opportunity for our partner nations to dialogue on topics that will ultimately save lives,” he said. “That’s the most important thing.”

PHOTO CAPTION: Capt. Henry Kyobe (right), Department of Public Health, Ugandan Peoples Defence Forces, and Dr. Rose Akurut, Ugandan Ministry of Agriculture, brief the status of security for humanitarian aid being delivered during a table top exercise (TTX), which simulates a natural disaster taking place in Uganda, Oct. 17-23. The TTX, part of Exercise Natural Fire 10, brought together key military and civic leaders from Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda to improve regional disaster response planning. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Maj. Kimberly Williams)

Table Top Exercise – East African partner nations test disaster response during Natural Fire 10 – US Army Africa – 091024

Table Top Exercise – East African partner nations test disaster response during Natural Fire 10 – US Army Africa – 091024
exercise plan
Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

East African partner nations test disaster response during Natural Fire 10

Story by Sgt. Maj. Kimberly Williams
U.S. Army Africa

ENTEBBE, Uganda – Recent natural disasters like the earthquake in Indonesia, the tsunami in Samoa and the H1N1 flu outbreak have brought home to the world that disaster response is a critical function that must be carefully planned, coordinated and conducted. During Exercise Natural Fire 10, representatives from U.S. Africa Command and other international disaster relief agencies brought many of their lessons learned to their East African partner nations in an effort to improve regional disaster response planning.

Key military and civic leaders from Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda came together to take part in an table top exercise (TTX) from Oct. 17-23 simulating a natural disaster taking place in Uganda that requires regional and international support and coordination. U.S. and international facilitators from U.S. Africa Command and the Center for Disaster and Humanitarian Assistance Medicine (CDHAM) developed and designed the exercise.

The scenario used for this TTX was a complex humanitarian disaster resulting from a pandemic flu, said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Carlos Williams, director of Education and Civil-Military Medicine for CDHAM.

Pandemic flus cross all borders and can affect large populations on a national, regional and international basis, said Williams, making this the perfect scenario for a regional partnership training event.

At the heart of the exercise lies U.S. Africa Command’s focus on improving partner nation military capacity in Africa. “The participants are recognizing how their militaries fit into a complex humanitarian disaster response,” said Williams.

“The goal was to bring national and regional participants to the table to discuss how to coordinate with the military during disasters to mitigate loss of life,” he said.
“The military has a wealth of experience in planning and execution,” said Shem Amadi, director and regional advisor of the Regional Disaster Management Center of Excellence located in Nairobi, Kenya. “Given the economic fragility in the region, the military brings a reservoir of manpower and materials that can be deployed quickly until the other systems are put into place.”

During the six day exercise, participants were split into three response teams: the military response team, consisting of Ugandan and partner nations’ military participants; the national response team, consisting of Ugandan representatives from the military, National Task Force for Influenza and civil organizations like World Food Program and the World Health Organizations; and the regional/international cell, consisting of representatives from the other East African countries, and other organizations like the African Union and the Regional Disaster Management Center of Excellence.

The first three days, the participants received background information on pandemic flu, the role of various disaster organizations and the military and the four steps of the disaster cycle: preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation, said Williams.

Then, the participants separated into the three groups and role-played their responses to the simulated pandemic flu outbreak around the world, resulting in the disaster in Uganda. The groups were separated by location in Entebbe and Kampala, and all communication had to be accomplished by phone, computer or meetings, just as in real-life.

As the three groups worked through the scenario, the communication and relationship building grew stronger each day, said Williams. “Our biggest goal is to get people around the table and talk about how to save lives, and it has been amazing,” he said.

“This is a good forum to share our national plans and harmonize our actions,” said Dr. Winyi Kaboyo, assistant commissioner to the Uganda Ministry of Health and secretary to the Uganda National Task Force for Influenza. “We can then move together to combat whatever disaster falls within our region.”

“The crucial point, which was very exciting, was bringing together the military to work with civil authorities,” said Kaboyo. “We have had interactions in the past, during outbreaks like Cholera and Ebola, but they were confined to addressing public health.

“Now, the TTX has expanded cooperation to include all disasters, like floods and earthquakes. We know now who to contact in the Ministry of Defence,” he said. “I hope it will be the same with the other participating countries.”

Amadi agreed. “It was a very fulfilling experience,” he said. “It added value to disaster preparedness and response in this region.”

The partner nations weren’t the only ones learning during the TTX, said Navy Lt. Efrain Rosario, the TTX lead planner from U.S. Africa Command. “We have learned quite a bit from the Ugandans on how to respond to natural disasters. We’re taking a lot back.”

Rosario said that this is the first time that U.S. Africa Command has conducted a TTX on such a large scale, but it won’t be the last. Another TTX is currently being planned for West Africa and could involve up to seven regional partners, he said.

After all the discussions, role playing and evaluations were complete, Williams said the exercise was an unqualified success. “Our goal is to create an opportunity for our partner nations to dialogue on topics that will ultimately save lives,” he said. “That’s the most important thing.”

PHOTO CAPTION: Virginia Nagy, Center for Disaster and Humanitarian Assistance Medicine, takes notes during the table top exercise (TTX) from Oct. 17-23 in Entebbe and Kampala, Uganda, that simulates a natural disaster taking place in Uganda. Key military and civic leaders from Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda took part in the TTX designed to improve regional disaster response planning. U.S. and international facilitators from U.S. Africa Command and the Center for Disaster and Humanitarian Assistance Medicine (CDHAM) developed and designed the exercise. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Maj. Kimberly Williams)