Can You Eat Healthy At In-N-Out – In-N-Out Burger Food Review

In N Out Burger food review. I have received a lot of request for an In-N-Out Burger food review video. I finally broke down and flew to Dallas, Texas (the closest In-N-Out Burger to me, the reason for the 0 price tag) and purchased In-N-Out Burger food. In my series “How to eat healthy if your going to eat fast food” I look at the ingredients of the food at fast food restaurants and pick, based on the ingredients, what the best food choices are. I have done food reviews at McDonalds, Wendys, Chick-Fil-A, Taco Bell, Burger King and Subway. The ingredients for each of their menus is on their respective websites. I was a little surprised to find that In-N-Out Burger will not disclose their ingredient list. If you eat at In-N-Out Burger you have no way of knowing what is in their food. In-N-Out Burger makes a lot of claims about having high quality ingredients, but since they won’t disclose an ingredient list, there is know way to substantiate their claim. I am unable to tell you what is the best food choice to eat at In-N-Out Burger. So, based on the lack of ingredient listing I recommend that you don’t eat at In-N-Out Burger since you have no idea what you are eating if you do. To answer a common question before it is asked. No, I didn’t eat the In-N-Out Burger and fries in the video. Instead I put them on a plate on the shelf and I will revisit them in a few weeks to see how the look. Please share this video. Thanks for watching. For more information on food quality

Optimizing Your Vegan Diet for Better Health

A presentation by William Harris, MD Founding VSH board member and resident skeptic William Harris, MD mentions a few free downloads he has put online including the latest USDA Nutrient Database in Excel format, and then reiterates his opinion that a vegan diet and regular exercise are the prime determinants of health, all therapeutic options being secondary. He has a few choice words for the recent food scares that blame plant foods for E. coli and Salmonellosis when those microbes can$ {q}t be grown in plant media, and argues that it$ {q}s contamination from nearby animal agriculture that brings on these news bites. Never a big fan of the high carb, low fat mantra, Bill suggests that the fat phobia goes againsta primal fat requirement in order forlife to even exist, although he does point out that all foods with fat but no fiber are threats to health. He backs up the dictum “If Man Made it Don$ {q}t Eat it,” explaining how the US food industry, with government financial backing and deceptive advertising and labeling, has destroyed American health in its pursuit of profit. A vegan for more than 40 years, William Harris, MD, is a founding and current director of the Vegetarian Society of Hawaii. Prior to his retirement he was an emergency physician and the director of the Kaiser Permanente Vegetarian Lifestyle Clinic. He received his medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco and is the author of The Scientific Basis of Vegetarianism. Retirement has
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Women’s Health, Nutrition, Fitness, Motivation, tip of the day, at ILovePrettyKeli.com

Visit www.Iloveprettykeli.com this is a women’s health website that has daily tips on nutrition, fitness, motivation and more! I came up with the idea for this site after receiving numerous replies to my “how to lose 20lbs in 2 weeks” video. It inspired me to work hard providing women with information that can help them daily. Nutrition The nutrition section gives women daily tips on foods they should add to their diet, foods they shouldn’t eat, as well as healthy receipes, and diets. iloveprettykeli.com Exercise: This section was made to give you some ideas on different exercises you can try in order to acheive your particular fitness goals. iloveprettykeli.com Motivation: This was designed to provide daily motivation to women who need that extra boost. We all need to be motivated from time to time. This section will not only motivate you, but it will provide you with ideas on how you can motivate yourself iloveprettykeli.com Tip of the day: Check here daily for tips on your overall physical health, as well as mental health. iloveprettykeli.com Special Posts: Every Monday is “motivation monday” This is the day to put yourself or a woman you know in the spotlight by sharing her motivational story with me. If you have someone you would like to feature send me a message letting me know their story along with a name and a picture. They might be chosen! ^_^ Iloveprettykeli also has daily tips for women as well as nutritional information, how to videos a quote of the day tips
Video Rating: 4 / 5

The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford

The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford
Healthy Eating Articles
Image by UGArdener
We spent a rainy Sunday morning sampling the collection of this beautiful museum. The sometimes blurry pictures of the paintings and other art objects were taken quickly without a tripod, and are included to give some idea of the range and depth of this magnificent collection. The cafeteria downstairs is a bright, pleasant and relatively inexpensive place to get a good, quick healthy lunch in Oxford.

Here is the introduction from the current Wikipedia article:

The Ashmolean Museum (in full the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology) on Beaumont Street, Oxford, England, is the world’s first university museum. Its first building is sometimes attributed to Sir Christopher Wren, though there is no good evidence for this claim, and was built in 1678–1683 to house the collection or cabinet of curiosities Elias Ashmole gave Oxford University in 1677.
The works include that of Elias Ashmole, which he had collected himself as well as those he had acquired from the gardeners, travellers and collectors John Tradescant the elder and his son of the same name. The collection included antique coins, books, engravings, geological specimens, and zoological specimens — one of which was the stuffed body of the last Dodo ever seen in Europe, but by 1755 it was so moth-eaten it was destroyed, except for its head and one claw. The museum opened on 6 June 1683, with naturalist Robert Plot as the first keeper.
After the various specimens had been moved into new museums, the "Old Ashmolean" building on Broad Street was used as office space for the Oxford English Dictionary staff. Since 1935, the building has been established as the Museum of the History of Science, with exhibitions including the scientific instruments given to Oxford University by Lewis Evans (1853–1930), amongst them the world’s largest collection of astrolabes.
The present building dates from 1845. It was designed by Charles Cockerell in a classical style and stands on Beaumont Street. One wing of the building is occupied by the Taylor Institution, the modern languages faculty of the university. The main museum contains the original collections of Elias Ashmole and John Tradescant (father and son), as well as huge collections of archaeology specimens and fine art. It has one of the best collections of Pre-Raphaelite paintings, majolica pottery and English silver. The archaeology department includes the bequest of Arthur Evans and so has an excellent collection of Greek and Minoan pottery. The department also has an extensive collection of antiquities from Ancient Egypt and the Sudan, and the museum hosts the Griffith Institute for the advancement of Egyptology.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashmolean_Museum

How to eat Healthy Food – Without all the Fuss

I’ve come up with a way to eat extremely healthy food without all the faffing around involved with preparation. HERE’S A BASIC RECIPE… 1. Add whatever vegetables you have available to a large cooking pot (roughly cut) 2. Remember to Include potatoes if you want it to be creamy. 3. Add legumes (split peas/ lentils etc) and/or beans for protein (you may need to pre-cook these first as the vegetables will generally only need about 20 minutes of simmering time, but some legume’s and beans require longer.) 4. Add salt & pepper to taste. 5. Top up with water (preferably filtered) so the vegetables are covered, plus a bit more. 6. Bring to the boil, then simmer for about 20-25 minutes untill all the vegetables are soft. 7. Allow to cool, then scoop into a blender and liquidize to the desired texture. 8. Throw your microwave in the bin and heat in a saucepan, stirring with woodden utensils only. Serve with warm, freshly baked whole-grain bread spread with organic butter, Yummy! Process all of the soup and pour into 3 or 4 non-plastic bowls. keep in the fridge and freeze any that you will not use within 2 days. .

The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford

The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford
Healthy Eating Articles
Image by UGArdener
We spent a rainy Sunday morning sampling the collection of this beautiful museum. The sometimes blurry pictures of the paintings and other art objects were taken quickly without a tripod, and are included to give some idea of the range and depth of this magnificent collection. The cafeteria downstairs is a bright, pleasant and relatively inexpensive place to get a good, quick healthy lunch in Oxford.

Here is the introduction from the current Wikipedia article:

The Ashmolean Museum (in full the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology) on Beaumont Street, Oxford, England, is the world’s first university museum. Its first building is sometimes attributed to Sir Christopher Wren, though there is no good evidence for this claim, and was built in 1678–1683 to house the collection or cabinet of curiosities Elias Ashmole gave Oxford University in 1677.
The works include that of Elias Ashmole, which he had collected himself as well as those he had acquired from the gardeners, travellers and collectors John Tradescant the elder and his son of the same name. The collection included antique coins, books, engravings, geological specimens, and zoological specimens — one of which was the stuffed body of the last Dodo ever seen in Europe, but by 1755 it was so moth-eaten it was destroyed, except for its head and one claw. The museum opened on 6 June 1683, with naturalist Robert Plot as the first keeper.
After the various specimens had been moved into new museums, the "Old Ashmolean" building on Broad Street was used as office space for the Oxford English Dictionary staff. Since 1935, the building has been established as the Museum of the History of Science, with exhibitions including the scientific instruments given to Oxford University by Lewis Evans (1853–1930), amongst them the world’s largest collection of astrolabes.
The present building dates from 1845. It was designed by Charles Cockerell in a classical style and stands on Beaumont Street. One wing of the building is occupied by the Taylor Institution, the modern languages faculty of the university. The main museum contains the original collections of Elias Ashmole and John Tradescant (father and son), as well as huge collections of archaeology specimens and fine art. It has one of the best collections of Pre-Raphaelite paintings, majolica pottery and English silver. The archaeology department includes the bequest of Arthur Evans and so has an excellent collection of Greek and Minoan pottery. The department also has an extensive collection of antiquities from Ancient Egypt and the Sudan, and the museum hosts the Griffith Institute for the advancement of Egyptology.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashmolean_Museum

The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford

The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford
Healthy Eating Articles
Image by UGArdener
We spent a rainy Sunday morning sampling the collection of this beautiful museum. The sometimes blurry pictures of the paintings and other art objects were taken quickly without a tripod, and are included to give some idea of the range and depth of this magnificent collection. The cafeteria downstairs is a bright, pleasant and relatively inexpensive place to get a good, quick healthy lunch in Oxford.

Here is the introduction from the current Wikipedia article:

The Ashmolean Museum (in full the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology) on Beaumont Street, Oxford, England, is the world’s first university museum. Its first building is sometimes attributed to Sir Christopher Wren, though there is no good evidence for this claim, and was built in 1678–1683 to house the collection or cabinet of curiosities Elias Ashmole gave Oxford University in 1677.
The works include that of Elias Ashmole, which he had collected himself as well as those he had acquired from the gardeners, travellers and collectors John Tradescant the elder and his son of the same name. The collection included antique coins, books, engravings, geological specimens, and zoological specimens — one of which was the stuffed body of the last Dodo ever seen in Europe, but by 1755 it was so moth-eaten it was destroyed, except for its head and one claw. The museum opened on 6 June 1683, with naturalist Robert Plot as the first keeper.
After the various specimens had been moved into new museums, the "Old Ashmolean" building on Broad Street was used as office space for the Oxford English Dictionary staff. Since 1935, the building has been established as the Museum of the History of Science, with exhibitions including the scientific instruments given to Oxford University by Lewis Evans (1853–1930), amongst them the world’s largest collection of astrolabes.
The present building dates from 1845. It was designed by Charles Cockerell in a classical style and stands on Beaumont Street. One wing of the building is occupied by the Taylor Institution, the modern languages faculty of the university. The main museum contains the original collections of Elias Ashmole and John Tradescant (father and son), as well as huge collections of archaeology specimens and fine art. It has one of the best collections of Pre-Raphaelite paintings, majolica pottery and English silver. The archaeology department includes the bequest of Arthur Evans and so has an excellent collection of Greek and Minoan pottery. The department also has an extensive collection of antiquities from Ancient Egypt and the Sudan, and the museum hosts the Griffith Institute for the advancement of Egyptology.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashmolean_Museum

The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford

The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford
Healthy Eating Articles
Image by UGArdener
We spent a rainy Sunday morning sampling the collection of this beautiful museum. The sometimes blurry pictures of the paintings and other art objects were taken quickly without a tripod, and are included to give some idea of the range and depth of this magnificent collection. The cafeteria downstairs is a bright, pleasant and relatively inexpensive place to get a good, quick healthy lunch in Oxford.

Here is the introduction from the current Wikipedia article:

The Ashmolean Museum (in full the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology) on Beaumont Street, Oxford, England, is the world’s first university museum. Its first building is sometimes attributed to Sir Christopher Wren, though there is no good evidence for this claim, and was built in 1678–1683 to house the collection or cabinet of curiosities Elias Ashmole gave Oxford University in 1677.
The works include that of Elias Ashmole, which he had collected himself as well as those he had acquired from the gardeners, travellers and collectors John Tradescant the elder and his son of the same name. The collection included antique coins, books, engravings, geological specimens, and zoological specimens — one of which was the stuffed body of the last Dodo ever seen in Europe, but by 1755 it was so moth-eaten it was destroyed, except for its head and one claw. The museum opened on 6 June 1683, with naturalist Robert Plot as the first keeper.
After the various specimens had been moved into new museums, the "Old Ashmolean" building on Broad Street was used as office space for the Oxford English Dictionary staff. Since 1935, the building has been established as the Museum of the History of Science, with exhibitions including the scientific instruments given to Oxford University by Lewis Evans (1853–1930), amongst them the world’s largest collection of astrolabes.
The present building dates from 1845. It was designed by Charles Cockerell in a classical style and stands on Beaumont Street. One wing of the building is occupied by the Taylor Institution, the modern languages faculty of the university. The main museum contains the original collections of Elias Ashmole and John Tradescant (father and son), as well as huge collections of archaeology specimens and fine art. It has one of the best collections of Pre-Raphaelite paintings, majolica pottery and English silver. The archaeology department includes the bequest of Arthur Evans and so has an excellent collection of Greek and Minoan pottery. The department also has an extensive collection of antiquities from Ancient Egypt and the Sudan, and the museum hosts the Griffith Institute for the advancement of Egyptology.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashmolean_Museum

The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford

The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford
Healthy Eating Articles
Image by UGArdener
We spent a rainy Sunday morning sampling the collection of this beautiful museum. The sometimes blurry pictures of the paintings and other art objects were taken quickly without a tripod, and are included to give some idea of the range and depth of this magnificent collection. The cafeteria downstairs is a bright, pleasant and relatively inexpensive place to get a good, quick healthy lunch in Oxford.

Here is the introduction from the current Wikipedia article:

The Ashmolean Museum (in full the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology) on Beaumont Street, Oxford, England, is the world’s first university museum. Its first building is sometimes attributed to Sir Christopher Wren, though there is no good evidence for this claim, and was built in 1678–1683 to house the collection or cabinet of curiosities Elias Ashmole gave Oxford University in 1677.
The works include that of Elias Ashmole, which he had collected himself as well as those he had acquired from the gardeners, travellers and collectors John Tradescant the elder and his son of the same name. The collection included antique coins, books, engravings, geological specimens, and zoological specimens — one of which was the stuffed body of the last Dodo ever seen in Europe, but by 1755 it was so moth-eaten it was destroyed, except for its head and one claw. The museum opened on 6 June 1683, with naturalist Robert Plot as the first keeper.
After the various specimens had been moved into new museums, the "Old Ashmolean" building on Broad Street was used as office space for the Oxford English Dictionary staff. Since 1935, the building has been established as the Museum of the History of Science, with exhibitions including the scientific instruments given to Oxford University by Lewis Evans (1853–1930), amongst them the world’s largest collection of astrolabes.
The present building dates from 1845. It was designed by Charles Cockerell in a classical style and stands on Beaumont Street. One wing of the building is occupied by the Taylor Institution, the modern languages faculty of the university. The main museum contains the original collections of Elias Ashmole and John Tradescant (father and son), as well as huge collections of archaeology specimens and fine art. It has one of the best collections of Pre-Raphaelite paintings, majolica pottery and English silver. The archaeology department includes the bequest of Arthur Evans and so has an excellent collection of Greek and Minoan pottery. The department also has an extensive collection of antiquities from Ancient Egypt and the Sudan, and the museum hosts the Griffith Institute for the advancement of Egyptology.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashmolean_Museum

Green Tea Benefits: The Benefits Tea Can Offer One’s Body

Green Tea Benefits at frankbarzini.tumblr.com youtu.be Through mankind’s heritage, tea has been a beverage that’s been relished constantly. Each individual era that passed confirmed how this wondrous leaf has spread in the course of the earth sharing not simply a refreshing drink to savor on distinctive events or even basically for an afternoon snack, but in addition the benefits tea can present. For additional than 40 centuries our understanding of these health boosting capabilities happens to be typical location and right now, we’ve got uncovered all the more. Some say that we may have not even started to scratch the surface. For the reason that cultivation of tea has expanded through the abundant lands of China and Japan, quite a few varieties are already generated and like most other types of tea, they offer an enormous array of benefits to our bodies. At this time, three forms of tea stand out and they’re the black, green, and oolong tea. Among the three, green tea continues to be learned as being the variation which offers by far the most health advantages. Due to their insufficient fermentation, green tea preserves its abundant content of antioxidants, primarily the catechin EGCG, and that is the main source for its well-being benefitting skills. A lot of the far more identified health benefits green tea is capable of giving features awesome assistance in losing weight, escalating metabolic rates, increase energy levels, enhance excess fat oxidation, fight the
Video Rating: 5 / 5