365-IMG_0478 YMCA-RonSombilonGallery-PacBluePrinting

365-IMG_0478 YMCA-RonSombilonGallery-PacBluePrinting
Healthy Kids
Image by Ron Sombilon Gallery
YMCA Healthy Kids Day!

Family Portrait photography presented by the YMCA, Ron Sombilon Gallery & PacBlue Printing

www.VanYMCA.org
www.RonSombilonGallery.com
www.PacBluePrinting.com

Welcome to the YMCA of Greater Vancouver!

Last year, the YMCA of Greater Vancouver programs and services helped over 64,000 children, youth, men, women, families and older adults, from all faith traditions, cultural backgrounds and economic circumstances find opportunities for better health and brighter futures

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Camp FRESH 2011

Camp FRESH 2011
Healthy Food For Children
Image by Christiana Care
Anthony Graves eats all his carrots.

But only a few months ago, the 13-year-old from New Castle filled up on junk food.

“I used to eat chips, cupcakes and soda,” he says. “Now I eat carrots, broccoli and tomatoes.”

Anthony is enrolled in Camp FRESH, short for "fresh resources everyone should have," founded in 2007 by Christiana Care’s Center for Community Health, part of the Department of Family and Community Medicine. The nine-week program educates youth, ages 13-18, on nutrition and encourages them to eat healthy foods, while being aware that their food environment could make it difficult to do so.

Camp FRESH also works with the Delaware Center for Horticulture to educate youths on how people in urban communities can grow their own produce.

On a recent afternoon, Anthony and other campers asked people in Rodney Square to take the 2011 Community Food Access Survey to gauge the eating habits of people in the city of Wilmington and assess their attitudes on accessibility to healthy foods. They asked consumers what kinds of food they eat, where they buy groceries and how much they exercise.

Results from the first survey, administered in 2007, found that a lack of access to nutritious foods was a serious obstacle to healthy eating habits. Since then, two new supermarkets have opened—ShopRite on Market Street in Wilmington and Food Lion on Governor Printz Boulevard in Edgemoor.

The latest results, to be compiled in the fall, will help to identify continuing barriers in urban communities to eating nutritious, low-fat foods and working out.

Richard Johnson of Bear, a school disciplinarian who took the survey, told Anthony that he has given up red meat and fried foods and eats lots of fruits and vegetables. He thinks Camp FRESH will have a lasting, positive impact on the youths.

“Working in schools, I see that obesity is a serious problem with kids,” he says. “Christiana Care is doing a very good thing in teaching kids about nutrition.”

Indeed, Delawareans are getting fatter, according to a recent study by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The report says 28 percent of adults in the First State are obese, defined as weighing at least 20 percent more than normal. Among children, 33.2 percent are overweight or obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Campers come primarily from Wilmington, where corner stores carry little fresh produce and supermarkets are not readily accessible.

“We tell kids that fast food might taste good—but it is not good for you,” says Christopher C. Moore, healthy lifestyle coordinator at Christiana Care’s Center for Community Health. “We know that if given the right tools and information, the Camp FRESH youth have the ability to affect a lot of positive change.”

Over the years, more than 250 teens have participated in the program. Many say they are learning good habits that will last a lifetime.

“On the first day, I stopped drinking soda and started drinking water,” says Dkwan Brown, 14, of Wilmington. “Now I eat collard greens and salad. Anything that looks healthy, I will try.”

Instead of fried chicken, 13-year-old Aionna Williams of Wilmington asks her mother to make baked chicken. She and her mom stock up on veggies at ShopRite, Walmart and Target, as well as the Camp FRESH farmer’s market.

“The corner store is convenient but they don’t have healthy foods, only chips and stuff,” she says.

As for Anthony, he has lost 5 pounds and feels more energetic.

“I can tell that eating healthy foods is good for me,” he says. “That is why I want to get other people on board.”

Camp FRESH 2011

Camp FRESH 2011
Healthy Food For Children
Image by Christiana Care
Anthony Graves eats all his carrots.

But only a few months ago, the 13-year-old from New Castle filled up on junk food.

“I used to eat chips, cupcakes and soda,” he says. “Now I eat carrots, broccoli and tomatoes.”

Anthony is enrolled in Camp FRESH, short for "fresh resources everyone should have," founded in 2007 by Christiana Care’s Center for Community Health, part of the Department of Family and Community Medicine. The nine-week program educates youth, ages 13-18, on nutrition and encourages them to eat healthy foods, while being aware that their food environment could make it difficult to do so.

Camp FRESH also works with the Delaware Center for Horticulture to educate youths on how people in urban communities can grow their own produce.

On a recent afternoon, Anthony and other campers asked people in Rodney Square to take the 2011 Community Food Access Survey to gauge the eating habits of people in the city of Wilmington and assess their attitudes on accessibility to healthy foods. They asked consumers what kinds of food they eat, where they buy groceries and how much they exercise.

Results from the first survey, administered in 2007, found that a lack of access to nutritious foods was a serious obstacle to healthy eating habits. Since then, two new supermarkets have opened—ShopRite on Market Street in Wilmington and Food Lion on Governor Printz Boulevard in Edgemoor.

The latest results, to be compiled in the fall, will help to identify continuing barriers in urban communities to eating nutritious, low-fat foods and working out.

Richard Johnson of Bear, a school disciplinarian who took the survey, told Anthony that he has given up red meat and fried foods and eats lots of fruits and vegetables. He thinks Camp FRESH will have a lasting, positive impact on the youths.

“Working in schools, I see that obesity is a serious problem with kids,” he says. “Christiana Care is doing a very good thing in teaching kids about nutrition.”

Indeed, Delawareans are getting fatter, according to a recent study by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The report says 28 percent of adults in the First State are obese, defined as weighing at least 20 percent more than normal. Among children, 33.2 percent are overweight or obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Campers come primarily from Wilmington, where corner stores carry little fresh produce and supermarkets are not readily accessible.

“We tell kids that fast food might taste good—but it is not good for you,” says Christopher C. Moore, healthy lifestyle coordinator at Christiana Care’s Center for Community Health. “We know that if given the right tools and information, the Camp FRESH youth have the ability to affect a lot of positive change.”

Over the years, more than 250 teens have participated in the program. Many say they are learning good habits that will last a lifetime.

“On the first day, I stopped drinking soda and started drinking water,” says Dkwan Brown, 14, of Wilmington. “Now I eat collard greens and salad. Anything that looks healthy, I will try.”

Instead of fried chicken, 13-year-old Aionna Williams of Wilmington asks her mother to make baked chicken. She and her mom stock up on veggies at ShopRite, Walmart and Target, as well as the Camp FRESH farmer’s market.

“The corner store is convenient but they don’t have healthy foods, only chips and stuff,” she says.

As for Anthony, he has lost 5 pounds and feels more energetic.

“I can tell that eating healthy foods is good for me,” he says. “That is why I want to get other people on board.”

Teeth Whitening : Can Baking Powder Bleach Your Teeth?

Baking powder can bleach teeth because it contains baking soda. Simply create a paste of one-part baking powder to one-part water, and brush for one-to-two minutes. Whiten teeth with baking powder, making sure to rinse thoroughly after brushing, with tips from a licensed dental assistant in this free video on oral hygiene. Expert: Michelle McPhail Contact: www.MySolutionz.com Bio: Michelle McPhail has been a licensed dental assistant for seven years. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz
Video Rating: 4 / 5

How to Shop for Healthy Foods : Health & Digestion with Slow Eating

Eating slowly and chewing your food will promote better digestion.Learn how to shop for healthy foods to improve your diet and nutrition in this free video. Expert: Lisa La Barr Bio: Lisa La Barr is AFPA certified, a WAPF member, and a personal nutrition and wellness expert in Beverly Hills. Filmmaker: Nili Nathan

The Big Book of Recipes for Babies, Toddlers & Children: 365 Quick, Easy, and Healthy Dishes

The Big Book of Recipes for Babies, Toddlers & Children: 365 Quick, Easy, and Healthy Dishes

More than a cookbook, this indispensable kitchen companion not only offers delicious recipes for every day of the year, but also contains a wealth of information on child nutrition—from weaning and introducing solids to packing lunches and serving up party foods for older children. It emphasizes an easy approach to food preparation, with no complicated measurements or methods. Most important of all, there’s a wide variety of recipes for every stage of childhood development, complete with 50 “first food” recipes, 7-day meal planners, and sound snack ideas. Practical tips accompany the dishes, including methods for promoting healthy eating habits that support brain development and a strong immune system.
 

List Price: $ 19.95

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